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Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases?
Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2019; 11(2):335-347PA

Abstract

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders including steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Despite intensive research in the last two decades, there is currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved therapy for treating ALD. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of the gut-liver axis and gut microbiome on the pathogenesis of ALD. Alcohol may induce intestinal dysbiosis and increased intestinal permeability, which in turn result in increased levels of pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and translocation of microbial products from the gut to the liver (bacterial translocation). LPS is an inflammatory signal that activates toll-like receptor 4 on Kupffer cells, contributing to the inflammation observed in ALD. Recently, probiotics have been shown to be effective in reducing or preventing the progression of ALD. A potential mechanism is that the probiotics transforms the composition of intestinal microbiota, which leads to reductions in alcohol-induced dysbiosis, intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, endotoxemia, and consequently, the development of ALD. While transformation of intestinal microbiota by probiotics appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intestinal barrier dysfunction, there is a scarcity of research that studies probiotics in the context of ALD. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications of probiotics in the treatment of ALD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyo-dong, Chuncheon, 24253, South Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyo-dong, Chuncheon, 24253, South Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyo-dong, Chuncheon, 24253, South Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyo-dong, Chuncheon, 24253, South Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyo-dong, Chuncheon, 24253, South Korea. ktsuk@hallym.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29687200

Citation

Hong, Meegun, et al. "Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases?" Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, vol. 11, no. 2, 2019, pp. 335-347.
Hong M, Han DH, Hong J, et al. Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases? Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins. 2019;11(2):335-347.
Hong, M., Han, D. H., Hong, J., Kim, D. J., & Suk, K. T. (2019). Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases? Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, 11(2), pp. 335-347. doi:10.1007/s12602-018-9419-6.
Hong M, et al. Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases. Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins. 2019;11(2):335-347. PubMed PMID: 29687200.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are Probiotics Effective in Targeting Alcoholic Liver Diseases? AU - Hong,Meegun, AU - Han,Dae Hee, AU - Hong,Jitaek, AU - Kim,Dong Joon, AU - Suk,Ki Tae, PY - 2018/4/25/pubmed PY - 2018/4/25/medline PY - 2018/4/25/entrez KW - Alcoholic liver disease KW - Dysbiosis KW - Gut KW - Microbiota KW - Probiotics SP - 335 EP - 347 JF - Probiotics and antimicrobial proteins JO - Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders including steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Despite intensive research in the last two decades, there is currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved therapy for treating ALD. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of the gut-liver axis and gut microbiome on the pathogenesis of ALD. Alcohol may induce intestinal dysbiosis and increased intestinal permeability, which in turn result in increased levels of pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and translocation of microbial products from the gut to the liver (bacterial translocation). LPS is an inflammatory signal that activates toll-like receptor 4 on Kupffer cells, contributing to the inflammation observed in ALD. Recently, probiotics have been shown to be effective in reducing or preventing the progression of ALD. A potential mechanism is that the probiotics transforms the composition of intestinal microbiota, which leads to reductions in alcohol-induced dysbiosis, intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, endotoxemia, and consequently, the development of ALD. While transformation of intestinal microbiota by probiotics appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intestinal barrier dysfunction, there is a scarcity of research that studies probiotics in the context of ALD. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications of probiotics in the treatment of ALD. SN - 1867-1314 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29687200/Are_Probiotics_Effective_in_Targeting_Alcoholic_Liver_Diseases L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-018-9419-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -