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Antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in children with acute respiratory infection with or without nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage.
Infect Dis (Lond) 2018; 50(9):705-713ID

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We studied Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in young children with acute viral type respiratory infection and analyzed the findings in a multivariate model including age, nasopharyngeal carriage of the tested bacteria and pneumococcal vaccination.

METHODS

We included 227 children aged 6-23 months with acute respiratory infection. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for bacterial carriage through detection of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript with nCounter analysis. Acute and convalescent serum samples were tested for IgG antibody response against eight pneumococcal proteins, three proteins from H. influenzae and five proteins from M. catarrhalis in a fluorescent multiplex immunoassay.

RESULTS

A two-fold or greater increase in antibodies to S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis was detected in 27.8, 9.7 and 14.1%, respectively. Nasopharyngeal carriage of each of the studied bacteria was not associated with antibody response detection against each respective bacterium. Furthermore, neither age nor pneumococcal vaccination were independently associated to detection of antibody response against the studied bacteria. Children who carried H. influenzae had higher frequency of colonization by M. catarrhalis (175 [80.3%] vs. 2 [22.2%]; p < .001) than those without H. influenzae. Also, children with acute otitis media tended to have higher frequency of antibody response to S. pneumoniae.

CONCLUSION

Nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis did not induce significant increases in antibody levels to these bacteria. Carriage of pathogenic bacteria in the nasopharynx is not able to elicit antibody responses to protein antigens similar to those caused by symptomatic infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Postgraduate Programme in Health Sciences , Federal University of Bahia School of Medicine , Salvador , Brazil.a Postgraduate Programme in Health Sciences , Federal University of Bahia School of Medicine , Salvador , Brazil.a Postgraduate Programme in Health Sciences , Federal University of Bahia School of Medicine , Salvador , Brazil.a Postgraduate Programme in Health Sciences , Federal University of Bahia School of Medicine , Salvador , Brazil.b Department of Vaccinations and Immune Protection , National Institute for Health and Welfare , Helsinki , Finland.c Department of Paediatrics , Turku University and University Hospital , Turku , Finland.d Postgraduate Programme in Health Sciences, Department of Paediatrics , Federal University of Bahia School of Medicine , Salvador , Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29688138

Citation

Andrade, Dafne C., et al. "Antibody Responses Against Streptococcus Pneumoniae, Haemophilus Influenzae and Moraxella Catarrhalis in Children With Acute Respiratory Infection With or Without Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Carriage." Infectious Diseases (London, England), vol. 50, no. 9, 2018, pp. 705-713.
Andrade DC, Borges IC, Bouzas ML, et al. Antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in children with acute respiratory infection with or without nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage. Infect Dis (Lond). 2018;50(9):705-713.
Andrade, D. C., Borges, I. C., Bouzas, M. L., Oliveira, J. R., Käyhty, H., Ruuskanen, O., & Nascimento-Carvalho, C. (2018). Antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in children with acute respiratory infection with or without nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage. Infectious Diseases (London, England), 50(9), pp. 705-713. doi:10.1080/23744235.2018.1463451.
Andrade DC, et al. Antibody Responses Against Streptococcus Pneumoniae, Haemophilus Influenzae and Moraxella Catarrhalis in Children With Acute Respiratory Infection With or Without Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Carriage. Infect Dis (Lond). 2018;50(9):705-713. PubMed PMID: 29688138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in children with acute respiratory infection with or without nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage. AU - Andrade,Dafne C, AU - Borges,Igor C, AU - Bouzas,Maiara L, AU - Oliveira,Juliana R, AU - Käyhty,Helena, AU - Ruuskanen,Olli, AU - Nascimento-Carvalho,Cristiana, Y1 - 2018/04/24/ PY - 2018/4/25/pubmed PY - 2018/11/27/medline PY - 2018/4/25/entrez KW - Bacterial infection KW - Immune response KW - Nasopharynx KW - Pneumococcus KW - Vaccination SP - 705 EP - 713 JF - Infectious diseases (London, England) JO - Infect Dis (Lond) VL - 50 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: We studied Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in young children with acute viral type respiratory infection and analyzed the findings in a multivariate model including age, nasopharyngeal carriage of the tested bacteria and pneumococcal vaccination. METHODS: We included 227 children aged 6-23 months with acute respiratory infection. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for bacterial carriage through detection of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript with nCounter analysis. Acute and convalescent serum samples were tested for IgG antibody response against eight pneumococcal proteins, three proteins from H. influenzae and five proteins from M. catarrhalis in a fluorescent multiplex immunoassay. RESULTS: A two-fold or greater increase in antibodies to S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis was detected in 27.8, 9.7 and 14.1%, respectively. Nasopharyngeal carriage of each of the studied bacteria was not associated with antibody response detection against each respective bacterium. Furthermore, neither age nor pneumococcal vaccination were independently associated to detection of antibody response against the studied bacteria. Children who carried H. influenzae had higher frequency of colonization by M. catarrhalis (175 [80.3%] vs. 2 [22.2%]; p < .001) than those without H. influenzae. Also, children with acute otitis media tended to have higher frequency of antibody response to S. pneumoniae. CONCLUSION: Nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis did not induce significant increases in antibody levels to these bacteria. Carriage of pathogenic bacteria in the nasopharynx is not able to elicit antibody responses to protein antigens similar to those caused by symptomatic infections. SN - 2374-4243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29688138/Antibody_responses_against_Streptococcus_pneumoniae_Haemophilus_influenzae_and_Moraxella_catarrhalis_in_children_with_acute_respiratory_infection_with_or_without_nasopharyngeal_bacterial_carriage_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23744235.2018.1463451 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -