Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Self-reported snoring is associated with chronic kidney disease independent of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese.

Abstract

AIMS/INTRODUCTION

To investigate the correlation between snoring and chronic kidney disease (CKD), and explore whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) plays an important role in this relationship among middle-aged and elderly Chinese.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The participants included in the present study were categorized into three subgroups based on self-reported snoring frequency (regularly [≥3 times per week], occasionally [between 'regularly' and 'never'] or never [<1 time per month]). An estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was considered as CKD. We diagnosed MetS based on the 2004 Chinese Diabetes Society criteria. We explored the relationship between snoring and CKD by using multiple logistic regressions.

RESULTS

The frequency of MetS, MetS components and CKD was dramatically higher in regular snorers than in non-snorers and occasional snorers. The odds ratios for MetS and all the MetS elements, except for hyperglycemia, increased progressively with the snoring frequency (P < 0.001). Upon additional adjustment for other MetS components, snoring was not significantly related with hypertension; however, the associations between snoring frequency and overweight/obesity and dyslipidemia became attenuated, but still remained statistically significant (P < 0.01). Interestingly, odds ratios for CKD also increasingly augmented with snoring frequency (P < 0.001). Upon further adjustment for individual MetS components or MetS, regular snoring also resulted in a significantly increased odds ratio for CKD (odds ratio 1.72; P = 0.034) relative to non-snoring.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-reported snoring is closely associated with CKD independent of MetS among middle-aged and elderly Chinese.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Department of Geriatrics, Qingdao Haici Medical Treatment Group, Qingdao, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    ,

    Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

    ,

    Department of Endocrinology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

    Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

    Source

    Journal of diabetes investigation 10:1 2019 Jan pg 124-130

    MeSH

    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    China
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Glomerular Filtration Rate
    Humans
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
    Self Report
    Snoring

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29694704

    Citation

    Song, Jun, et al. "Self-reported Snoring Is Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease Independent of Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese." Journal of Diabetes Investigation, vol. 10, no. 1, 2019, pp. 124-130.
    Song J, Wang C, Ma A, et al. Self-reported snoring is associated with chronic kidney disease independent of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. J Diabetes Investig. 2019;10(1):124-130.
    Song, J., Wang, C., Ma, A., Zheng, H., Zheng, W., Hou, X., ... Jia, W. (2019). Self-reported snoring is associated with chronic kidney disease independent of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. Journal of Diabetes Investigation, 10(1), pp. 124-130. doi:10.1111/jdi.12855.
    Song J, et al. Self-reported Snoring Is Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease Independent of Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese. J Diabetes Investig. 2019;10(1):124-130. PubMed PMID: 29694704.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported snoring is associated with chronic kidney disease independent of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. AU - Song,Jun, AU - Wang,Chuan, AU - Ma,Aixia, AU - Zheng,Huizhen, AU - Zheng,Wenjian, AU - Hou,Xinguo, AU - Hu,Cheng, AU - Chen,Li, AU - Jia,Weiping, Y1 - 2018/06/05/ PY - 2018/01/22/received PY - 2018/04/13/revised PY - 2018/04/17/accepted PY - 2018/4/26/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2018/4/26/entrez KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Snoring SP - 124 EP - 130 JF - Journal of diabetes investigation JO - J Diabetes Investig VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS/INTRODUCTION: To investigate the correlation between snoring and chronic kidney disease (CKD), and explore whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) plays an important role in this relationship among middle-aged and elderly Chinese. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants included in the present study were categorized into three subgroups based on self-reported snoring frequency (regularly [≥3 times per week], occasionally [between 'regularly' and 'never'] or never [<1 time per month]). An estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was considered as CKD. We diagnosed MetS based on the 2004 Chinese Diabetes Society criteria. We explored the relationship between snoring and CKD by using multiple logistic regressions. RESULTS: The frequency of MetS, MetS components and CKD was dramatically higher in regular snorers than in non-snorers and occasional snorers. The odds ratios for MetS and all the MetS elements, except for hyperglycemia, increased progressively with the snoring frequency (P < 0.001). Upon additional adjustment for other MetS components, snoring was not significantly related with hypertension; however, the associations between snoring frequency and overweight/obesity and dyslipidemia became attenuated, but still remained statistically significant (P < 0.01). Interestingly, odds ratios for CKD also increasingly augmented with snoring frequency (P < 0.001). Upon further adjustment for individual MetS components or MetS, regular snoring also resulted in a significantly increased odds ratio for CKD (odds ratio 1.72; P = 0.034) relative to non-snoring. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported snoring is closely associated with CKD independent of MetS among middle-aged and elderly Chinese. SN - 2040-1124 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29694704/Self_reported_snoring_is_associated_with_chronic_kidney_disease_independent_of_metabolic_syndrome_in_middle_aged_and_elderly_Chinese_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jdi.12855 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -