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Early frailty transition predicts 15-year mortality among nondisabled older Mexican Americans.
Ann Epidemiol. 2018 06; 28(6):362-367.e3.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the effect of early frailty transitions on 15-year mortality risk.

METHODS

Longitudinal data analysis of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly involving 1171 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged ≥67 years and older. Frailty was determined using the modified frailty phenotype, including unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported exhaustion, and slow walking speed. Participants were defined at baseline as nonfrail, prefrail, or frail and divided into nine transition groups, during a 3-year observation period.

RESULTS

Mean age was 77.0 years (standard deviation [SD] = 5.3) and 59.1% were female. Participants who transitioned from prefrail to frail (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-2.28), frail to prefrail (HR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.05-2.28); or who remained frail (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21-2.44), had significant higher 15-year mortality risk than those who remained nonfrail. Participants transitioning from frail to nonfrail had a similar 15-year mortality risk as those who remained nonfrail (HR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.53-1.72). Weight loss and slow walking speed were associated with transitions to frailty.

CONCLUSIONS

An early transition from frail to nonfrail in older Mexican Americans was associated with a 4% decrease in mortality compared with those who remained nonfrail, although this difference was not statistically significant. Additional longitudinal research is needed to understand positive transitions in frailty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA.Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA; Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, UTMB, Galveston, USA.Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, UTMB, Galveston, USA.Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA. Electronic address: kottenba@utmb.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29703521

Citation

Li, Chih-Ying, et al. "Early Frailty Transition Predicts 15-year Mortality Among Nondisabled Older Mexican Americans." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 28, no. 6, 2018, pp. 362-367.e3.
Li CY, Al Snih S, Karmarkar A, et al. Early frailty transition predicts 15-year mortality among nondisabled older Mexican Americans. Ann Epidemiol. 2018;28(6):362-367.e3.
Li, C. Y., Al Snih, S., Karmarkar, A., Markides, K. S., & Ottenbacher, K. J. (2018). Early frailty transition predicts 15-year mortality among nondisabled older Mexican Americans. Annals of Epidemiology, 28(6), 362-e3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.03.021
Li CY, et al. Early Frailty Transition Predicts 15-year Mortality Among Nondisabled Older Mexican Americans. Ann Epidemiol. 2018;28(6):362-367.e3. PubMed PMID: 29703521.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early frailty transition predicts 15-year mortality among nondisabled older Mexican Americans. AU - Li,Chih-Ying, AU - Al Snih,Soham, AU - Karmarkar,Amol, AU - Markides,Kyriakos S, AU - Ottenbacher,Kenneth J, Y1 - 2018/04/12/ PY - 2017/09/27/received PY - 2018/03/23/revised PY - 2018/03/30/accepted PY - 2018/4/29/pubmed PY - 2019/6/21/medline PY - 2018/4/29/entrez KW - Frail Elderly KW - Mexican Americans KW - Mortality SP - 362 EP - 367.e3 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of early frailty transitions on 15-year mortality risk. METHODS: Longitudinal data analysis of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly involving 1171 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged ≥67 years and older. Frailty was determined using the modified frailty phenotype, including unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported exhaustion, and slow walking speed. Participants were defined at baseline as nonfrail, prefrail, or frail and divided into nine transition groups, during a 3-year observation period. RESULTS: Mean age was 77.0 years (standard deviation [SD] = 5.3) and 59.1% were female. Participants who transitioned from prefrail to frail (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-2.28), frail to prefrail (HR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.05-2.28); or who remained frail (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21-2.44), had significant higher 15-year mortality risk than those who remained nonfrail. Participants transitioning from frail to nonfrail had a similar 15-year mortality risk as those who remained nonfrail (HR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.53-1.72). Weight loss and slow walking speed were associated with transitions to frailty. CONCLUSIONS: An early transition from frail to nonfrail in older Mexican Americans was associated with a 4% decrease in mortality compared with those who remained nonfrail, although this difference was not statistically significant. Additional longitudinal research is needed to understand positive transitions in frailty. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29703521/Early_frailty_transition_predicts_15_year_mortality_among_nondisabled_older_Mexican_Americans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(17)30943-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -