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Garlic and Gaseous Mediators.
Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2018 07; 39(7):624-634.TP

Abstract

Garlic (Allium sativum) and allied plant species are rich sources of sulfur compounds. Major roles for garlic and its sulfur constituents include the regulation of vascular homeostasis and the control of metabolic systems linked to nutrient metabolism. Recent studies have indicated that some of these sulfur compounds, such as diallyl trisulfide (DATS), alter the levels of gaseous signalling molecules including nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and perhaps carbon monoxide (CO) in mammalian tissues. These gases are important in cellular processes associated with the cardiovascular system, inflammation, and neurological functions. Importantly, these studies build on the known biological effects of garlic and associated sulfur constituents. This review highlights our current understanding of the health benefits attributed to edible plants like garlic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK; School of Pharmacy and State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau. Electronic address: Peter.Rose@nottingham.ac.uk.Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117600, Singapore.School of Pharmacy and State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29706261

Citation

Rose, Peter, et al. "Garlic and Gaseous Mediators." Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 39, no. 7, 2018, pp. 624-634.
Rose P, Moore PK, Zhu YZ. Garlic and Gaseous Mediators. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2018;39(7):624-634.
Rose, P., Moore, P. K., & Zhu, Y. Z. (2018). Garlic and Gaseous Mediators. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, 39(7), 624-634. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tips.2018.03.009
Rose P, Moore PK, Zhu YZ. Garlic and Gaseous Mediators. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2018;39(7):624-634. PubMed PMID: 29706261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Garlic and Gaseous Mediators. AU - Rose,Peter, AU - Moore,Philip Keith, AU - Zhu,Yi-Zhun, Y1 - 2018/04/26/ PY - 2017/12/06/received PY - 2018/03/21/revised PY - 2018/03/26/accepted PY - 2018/5/1/pubmed PY - 2018/11/14/medline PY - 2018/5/1/entrez KW - carbon monoxide KW - garlic KW - gaseous mediators KW - hydrogen sulfide KW - nitric oxide KW - polysulfide SP - 624 EP - 634 JF - Trends in pharmacological sciences JO - Trends Pharmacol Sci VL - 39 IS - 7 N2 - Garlic (Allium sativum) and allied plant species are rich sources of sulfur compounds. Major roles for garlic and its sulfur constituents include the regulation of vascular homeostasis and the control of metabolic systems linked to nutrient metabolism. Recent studies have indicated that some of these sulfur compounds, such as diallyl trisulfide (DATS), alter the levels of gaseous signalling molecules including nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and perhaps carbon monoxide (CO) in mammalian tissues. These gases are important in cellular processes associated with the cardiovascular system, inflammation, and neurological functions. Importantly, these studies build on the known biological effects of garlic and associated sulfur constituents. This review highlights our current understanding of the health benefits attributed to edible plants like garlic. SN - 1873-3735 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29706261/Garlic_and_Gaseous_Mediators_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-6147(18)30061-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -