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The biogeographical imprint of mass extinctions.
Proc Biol Sci. 2018 05 16; 285(1878)PB

Abstract

Mass extinctions are defined by extinction rates significantly above background levels and have had substantial consequences for the evolution of life. Geographically selective extinctions, subsequent originations and species redistributions may have changed global biogeographical structure, but quantification of this change is lacking. In order to assess quantitatively the biogeographical impact of mass extinctions, we outline time-traceable bioregions for benthic marine species across the Phanerozoic using a compositional network. Mass extinction events are visually recognizable in the geographical depiction of bioregions. The end-Permian extinction stands out with a severe reduction of provinciality. Time series of biogeographical turnover represent a novel aspect of the analysis of mass extinctions, confirming concentration of changes in the geographical distribution of benthic marine life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Department of Geography and Geosciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Loewenichstraβe 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany adam.kocsis@fau.de. MTA-MTM-ELTE Research Group for Paleontology, POB 137, 1431 Budapest, Hungary.GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Department of Geography and Geosciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Loewenichstraβe 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Department of Geography and Geosciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Loewenichstraβe 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29720415

Citation

Kocsis, Ádám T., et al. "The Biogeographical Imprint of Mass Extinctions." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 285, no. 1878, 2018.
Kocsis ÁT, Reddin CJ, Kiessling W. The biogeographical imprint of mass extinctions. Proc Biol Sci. 2018;285(1878).
Kocsis, Á. T., Reddin, C. J., & Kiessling, W. (2018). The biogeographical imprint of mass extinctions. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 285(1878). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2018.0232
Kocsis ÁT, Reddin CJ, Kiessling W. The Biogeographical Imprint of Mass Extinctions. Proc Biol Sci. 2018 05 16;285(1878) PubMed PMID: 29720415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The biogeographical imprint of mass extinctions. AU - Kocsis,Ádám T, AU - Reddin,Carl J, AU - Kiessling,Wolfgang, PY - 2018/01/29/received PY - 2018/04/11/accepted PY - 2018/5/4/entrez PY - 2018/5/4/pubmed PY - 2019/4/4/medline KW - benthic KW - bioregions KW - mass extinctions KW - networks KW - palaeobiology JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc Biol Sci VL - 285 IS - 1878 N2 - Mass extinctions are defined by extinction rates significantly above background levels and have had substantial consequences for the evolution of life. Geographically selective extinctions, subsequent originations and species redistributions may have changed global biogeographical structure, but quantification of this change is lacking. In order to assess quantitatively the biogeographical impact of mass extinctions, we outline time-traceable bioregions for benthic marine species across the Phanerozoic using a compositional network. Mass extinction events are visually recognizable in the geographical depiction of bioregions. The end-Permian extinction stands out with a severe reduction of provinciality. Time series of biogeographical turnover represent a novel aspect of the analysis of mass extinctions, confirming concentration of changes in the geographical distribution of benthic marine life. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29720415/The_biogeographical_imprint_of_mass_extinctions_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2018.0232?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -