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Vitamin A and D intake in pregnancy, infant supplementation, and asthma development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 05 01; 107(5):789-798.AJ

Abstract

Background

Western diets may provide excess vitamin A, which is potentially toxic and could adversely affect respiratory health and counteract benefits from vitamin D.

Objective

The aim of this study was to examine child asthma at age 7 y in relation to maternal intake of vitamins A and D during pregnancy, infant supplementation with these vitamins, and their potential interaction.

Design

We studied 61,676 school-age children (born during 2002-2007) from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort with data on maternal total (food and supplement) nutrient intake in pregnancy (food-frequency questionnaire validated against biomarkers) and infant supplement use at age 6 mo (n = 54,142 children). Linkage with the Norwegian Prescription Database enabled near-complete follow-up (end of second quarter in 2015) for dispensed medications to classify asthma. We used log-binomial regression to calculate adjusted RRs (aRRs) for asthma with 95% CIs.

Results

Asthma increased according to maternal intake of total vitamin A [retinol activity equivalents (RAEs)] in the highest (≥2031 RAEs/d) compared with the lowest (≤779 RAEs/d) quintile (aRR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40) and decreased for total vitamin D in the highest (≥13.6 µg/d) compared with the lowest (≤3.5 µg/d) quintile (aRR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.97) during pregnancy. No association was observed for maternal intake in the highest quintiles of both nutrients (aRR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18) and infant supplementation with vitamin D or cod liver oil.

Conclusions

Excess vitamin A (≥2.5 times the recommended intake) during pregnancy was associated with increased risk, whereas vitamin D intake close to recommendations was associated with a reduced risk of asthma in school-age children. No association for high intakes of both nutrients suggests antagonistic effects of vitamins A and D. This trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03197233.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Mental and Physical Health. Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.Division of Mental and Physical Health. Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom. Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Bristol, United Kingdom.Division of Mental and Physical Health.Division of Mental and Physical Health.Division of Mental and Physical Health. Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Department of Exposure and Risk Assessment.Division of Mental and Physical Health.Division of Mental and Physical Health. Department of Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC.Division of Mental and Physical Health. Center for Fertility and Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.Division of Mental and Physical Health.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29722838

Citation

Parr, Christine L., et al. "Vitamin a and D Intake in Pregnancy, Infant Supplementation, and Asthma Development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 107, no. 5, 2018, pp. 789-798.
Parr CL, Magnus MC, Karlstad Ø, et al. Vitamin A and D intake in pregnancy, infant supplementation, and asthma development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2018;107(5):789-798.
Parr, C. L., Magnus, M. C., Karlstad, Ø., Holvik, K., Lund-Blix, N. A., Haugen, M., Page, C. M., Nafstad, P., Ueland, P. M., London, S. J., Håberg, S. E., & Nystad, W. (2018). Vitamin A and D intake in pregnancy, infant supplementation, and asthma development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 107(5), 789-798. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqy016
Parr CL, et al. Vitamin a and D Intake in Pregnancy, Infant Supplementation, and Asthma Development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2018 05 1;107(5):789-798. PubMed PMID: 29722838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin A and D intake in pregnancy, infant supplementation, and asthma development: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. AU - Parr,Christine L, AU - Magnus,Maria C, AU - Karlstad,Øystein, AU - Holvik,Kristin, AU - Lund-Blix,Nicolai A, AU - Haugen,Margareta, AU - Page,Christian M, AU - Nafstad,Per, AU - Ueland,Per M, AU - London,Stephanie J, AU - Håberg,Siri E, AU - Nystad,Wenche, PY - 2017/06/13/received PY - 2018/01/17/accepted PY - 2018/5/4/entrez PY - 2018/5/4/pubmed PY - 2019/7/5/medline SP - 789 EP - 798 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 107 IS - 5 N2 - Background: Western diets may provide excess vitamin A, which is potentially toxic and could adversely affect respiratory health and counteract benefits from vitamin D. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine child asthma at age 7 y in relation to maternal intake of vitamins A and D during pregnancy, infant supplementation with these vitamins, and their potential interaction. Design: We studied 61,676 school-age children (born during 2002-2007) from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort with data on maternal total (food and supplement) nutrient intake in pregnancy (food-frequency questionnaire validated against biomarkers) and infant supplement use at age 6 mo (n = 54,142 children). Linkage with the Norwegian Prescription Database enabled near-complete follow-up (end of second quarter in 2015) for dispensed medications to classify asthma. We used log-binomial regression to calculate adjusted RRs (aRRs) for asthma with 95% CIs. Results: Asthma increased according to maternal intake of total vitamin A [retinol activity equivalents (RAEs)] in the highest (≥2031 RAEs/d) compared with the lowest (≤779 RAEs/d) quintile (aRR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40) and decreased for total vitamin D in the highest (≥13.6 µg/d) compared with the lowest (≤3.5 µg/d) quintile (aRR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.97) during pregnancy. No association was observed for maternal intake in the highest quintiles of both nutrients (aRR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18) and infant supplementation with vitamin D or cod liver oil. Conclusions: Excess vitamin A (≥2.5 times the recommended intake) during pregnancy was associated with increased risk, whereas vitamin D intake close to recommendations was associated with a reduced risk of asthma in school-age children. No association for high intakes of both nutrients suggests antagonistic effects of vitamins A and D. This trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03197233. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29722838/Vitamin_A_and_D_intake_in_pregnancy_infant_supplementation_and_asthma_development:_the_Norwegian_Mother_and_Child_Cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqy016 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -