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Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: A Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment.
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2018 05; 31(3):107-113.JG

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Social isolation and living alone have been associated with negative outcomes, especially in the older population. We aim to investigate the effect of living alone on the development of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

MATERIALS AND METHODS

In this longitudinal study, we enrolled 345 outpatients with MCI evaluated at baseline through a clinical and neuropsychological protocol. Data on living situation (living alone vs. living with someone) were also collected. The development of dementia at follow-up was the outcome of the study. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression analyses. Laplace regression was used to model the time-to-dementia diagnosis as a function of living situation.

RESULTS

During the follow-up time (mean [SD]: 2.8 [2.2] years), 172 (50%) participants developed dementia. After controlling for age, sex, years of education, MCI subtype, presence of comorbidities, and antidepressant therapy, people with MCI living alone were more likely to develop dementia (HR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1), when compared to those living with someone. In addition, participants with MCI living alone were diagnosed with dementia 1 year earlier than those living with someone (P = .012).

CONCLUSION

Living alone increases by 50% the risk of developing dementia and anticipates by 1 year the diagnosis in people with MCI. These results, in line with findings of previous population-based studies, emphasize the pivotal role of the living situation in identifying a frailer share of the population at higher risk of dementia to which devote ad hoc assessment and care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. 2 Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.2 Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. 3 Department of Geriatrics, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.4 National Centre of Epidemiology, National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy.1 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Department, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.2 Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29739278

Citation

Grande, Giulia, et al. "Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: a Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment." Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, vol. 31, no. 3, 2018, pp. 107-113.
Grande G, Vetrano DL, Cova I, et al. Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: A Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2018;31(3):107-113.
Grande, G., Vetrano, D. L., Cova, I., Pomati, S., Mattavelli, D., Maggiore, L., Cucumo, V., Ghiretti, R., Vanacore, N., Mariani, C., & Rizzuto, D. (2018). Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: A Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 31(3), 107-113. https://doi.org/10.1177/0891988718774425
Grande G, et al. Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: a Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2018;31(3):107-113. PubMed PMID: 29739278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Living Alone and Dementia Incidence: A Clinical-Based Study in People With Mild Cognitive Impairment. AU - Grande,Giulia, AU - Vetrano,Davide Liborio, AU - Cova,Ilaria, AU - Pomati,Simone, AU - Mattavelli,Daniele, AU - Maggiore,Laura, AU - Cucumo,Valentina, AU - Ghiretti,Roberta, AU - Vanacore,Nicola, AU - Mariani,Claudio, AU - Rizzuto,Debora, Y1 - 2018/05/08/ PY - 2018/5/10/pubmed PY - 2019/1/10/medline PY - 2018/5/10/entrez KW - dementia KW - living situation KW - longitudinal study KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - prevention SP - 107 EP - 113 JF - Journal of geriatric psychiatry and neurology JO - J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol VL - 31 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Social isolation and living alone have been associated with negative outcomes, especially in the older population. We aim to investigate the effect of living alone on the development of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this longitudinal study, we enrolled 345 outpatients with MCI evaluated at baseline through a clinical and neuropsychological protocol. Data on living situation (living alone vs. living with someone) were also collected. The development of dementia at follow-up was the outcome of the study. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression analyses. Laplace regression was used to model the time-to-dementia diagnosis as a function of living situation. RESULTS: During the follow-up time (mean [SD]: 2.8 [2.2] years), 172 (50%) participants developed dementia. After controlling for age, sex, years of education, MCI subtype, presence of comorbidities, and antidepressant therapy, people with MCI living alone were more likely to develop dementia (HR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1), when compared to those living with someone. In addition, participants with MCI living alone were diagnosed with dementia 1 year earlier than those living with someone (P = .012). CONCLUSION: Living alone increases by 50% the risk of developing dementia and anticipates by 1 year the diagnosis in people with MCI. These results, in line with findings of previous population-based studies, emphasize the pivotal role of the living situation in identifying a frailer share of the population at higher risk of dementia to which devote ad hoc assessment and care. SN - 0891-9887 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29739278/Living_Alone_and_Dementia_Incidence:_A_Clinical_Based_Study_in_People_With_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0891988718774425?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -