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Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults.
Am J Health Promot 2019; 33(1):39-47AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine associations between knowledge of health conditions and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake among Hispanic adults.

DESIGN

Quantitative, cross-sectional study.

SETTING

The 2015 Estilos survey data.

PARTICIPANTS

One thousand US Hispanic adults (≥18 years).

MEASURES

The outcome variable was frequency of SSB intake (regular soda, fruit drink, sports/energy drink, and sweetened coffee/tea drink). Exposure variables were knowledge of 6 SSB-related health conditions (weight gain, diabetes, dental caries, high cholesterol, heart disease, and hypertension).

ANALYSIS

Six multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for consuming SSBs ≥3 times/day (high intake), in relation to knowledge of SSB-related health conditions.

RESULTS

Overall, 58% of Hispanic adults consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day and 36% consumed SSBs ≥3 times/day. Although most identified that weight gain (75%) and diabetes (76%) were related to drinking SSBs, only half identified this relation with dental caries (57%) and hypertension (41%). Even fewer identified high cholesterol (32%) and heart disease (32%) as related. In crude analyses, SSB intake was significantly associated with knowledge of the associations between SSBs and weight gain, dental caries, and heart disease; however, after adjusting for sociodemographics and acculturation, associations were no longer significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Although SSB intake was very high, knowledge of SSB-related health conditions was low and was not related to high SSB intake among US Hispanic adults. Education efforts alone may not be adequate for Hispanic adults to change their behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.2 College of Health and Human Services, SDSU and Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA, USA.3 Health Promotion and Community Health Sciences and Program for Research and Outreach-Engagement on Nutrition and Health Disparities Solutions, Texas A&M University School of Public Health, College Station, TX, USA.1 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29747519

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults." American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, vol. 33, no. 1, 2019, pp. 39-47.
Park S, Ayala GX, Sharkey JR, et al. Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults. Am J Health Promot. 2019;33(1):39-47.
Park, S., Ayala, G. X., Sharkey, J. R., & Blanck, H. M. (2019). Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults. American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, 33(1), pp. 39-47. doi:10.1177/0890117118774206.
Park S, et al. Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults. Am J Health Promot. 2019;33(1):39-47. PubMed PMID: 29747519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge of Health Conditions Associated With Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Low Among US Hispanic Adults. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Ayala,Guadalupe X, AU - Sharkey,Joseph R, AU - Blanck,Heidi M, Y1 - 2018/05/10/ PY - 2018/5/12/pubmed PY - 2019/11/30/medline PY - 2018/5/12/entrez KW - Hispanic adults KW - knowledge KW - sociodemographic characteristics KW - sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 39 EP - 47 JF - American journal of health promotion : AJHP JO - Am J Health Promot VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine associations between knowledge of health conditions and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake among Hispanic adults. DESIGN: Quantitative, cross-sectional study. SETTING: The 2015 Estilos survey data. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand US Hispanic adults (≥18 years). MEASURES: The outcome variable was frequency of SSB intake (regular soda, fruit drink, sports/energy drink, and sweetened coffee/tea drink). Exposure variables were knowledge of 6 SSB-related health conditions (weight gain, diabetes, dental caries, high cholesterol, heart disease, and hypertension). ANALYSIS: Six multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for consuming SSBs ≥3 times/day (high intake), in relation to knowledge of SSB-related health conditions. RESULTS: Overall, 58% of Hispanic adults consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day and 36% consumed SSBs ≥3 times/day. Although most identified that weight gain (75%) and diabetes (76%) were related to drinking SSBs, only half identified this relation with dental caries (57%) and hypertension (41%). Even fewer identified high cholesterol (32%) and heart disease (32%) as related. In crude analyses, SSB intake was significantly associated with knowledge of the associations between SSBs and weight gain, dental caries, and heart disease; however, after adjusting for sociodemographics and acculturation, associations were no longer significant. CONCLUSIONS: Although SSB intake was very high, knowledge of SSB-related health conditions was low and was not related to high SSB intake among US Hispanic adults. Education efforts alone may not be adequate for Hispanic adults to change their behaviors. SN - 2168-6602 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29747519/Knowledge_of_Health_Conditions_Associated_With_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_Is_Low_Among_US_Hispanic_Adults_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0890117118774206?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -