Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression: accumulative evidence from an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.
Br J Nutr 2018; 119(10):1087-1101BJ

Abstract

Findings from observational studies investigating the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression were inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise available data on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and depression. A systematic literature search of relevant reports published in Medline/PubMed, ISI (Web of Science), SCOPUS and Google Scholar until Oct 2017 was conducted. Data from 27 publications (sixteen cross-sectional, nine cohort and two case-control studies) on fruit, vegetables and/or total fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to depression were included in the systematic review. A total of eighteen studies that reported relative risks (RR), hazard ratios or OR for the relationship were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR for depression in the highest v. the lowest category of fruit intake was 0·83 (95 % CI 0·71, 0·98) in cohort studies and 0·76 (95 % CI 0·63, 0·92) in cross-sectional studies. Consumption of vegetables was also associated with a 14 % lower risk of depression (overall RR=0·86; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·98) in cohort studies and a 25 % lower risk of depression (overall RR=0·75; 95 % CI 0·62, 0·91) in cross-sectional studies. Moreover, an inverse significant association was observed between intake of total fruit and vegetables and risk of depression (overall RR=0·80; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·98) in cross-sectional studies. In a non-linear dose-response association, we failed to find any significant association between fruit or vegetable intake and risk of depression (fruit (cross-sectional studies): P non-linearty=0·12; vegetables (cross-sectional studies): P non-linearty<0·001; (cohort studies) P non-linearty=0·97). Meta-regression of included observational studies revealed an inverse linear association between fruit or vegetable intake and risk of depression, such that every 100-g increased intake of fruit was associated with a 3 % reduced risk of depression in cohort studies (RR=0·97; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·99). With regard to vegetable consumption, every 100-g increase in intake was associated with a 3 % reduced risk of depression in cohort studies (RR=0·97; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·98) and 5 % reduced odds in cross-sectional studies (RR=0·95; 95 % CI 0·91, 0·98). This meta-analysis of observational studies provides further evidence that fruit and vegetable intake was protectively associated with depression. This finding supports the current recommendation of increasing fruit and vegetable intake to improve mental health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Students' Scientific Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 1417755331, Tehran,Iran.1Students' Scientific Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 1417755331, Tehran,Iran.3Department of Community Nutrition,School of Nutrition and Food Science,Food Security Research Center,Isfahan University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 8174673461, Isfahan,Iran.1Students' Scientific Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 1417755331, Tehran,Iran.4Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center,Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute,Tehran University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 1414413137, Tehran,Iran.2Department of Community Nutrition,School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics,Tehran University of Medical Sciences,PO Box 141556117, Tehran,Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29759102

Citation

Saghafian, Faezeh, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Risk of Depression: Accumulative Evidence From an Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiological Studies." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 119, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1087-1101.
Saghafian F, Malmir H, Saneei P, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression: accumulative evidence from an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(10):1087-1101.
Saghafian, F., Malmir, H., Saneei, P., Milajerdi, A., Larijani, B., & Esmaillzadeh, A. (2018). Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression: accumulative evidence from an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. The British Journal of Nutrition, 119(10), pp. 1087-1101. doi:10.1017/S0007114518000697.
Saghafian F, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Risk of Depression: Accumulative Evidence From an Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiological Studies. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(10):1087-1101. PubMed PMID: 29759102.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression: accumulative evidence from an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. AU - Saghafian,Faezeh, AU - Malmir,Hanieh, AU - Saneei,Parvane, AU - Milajerdi,Alireza, AU - Larijani,Bagher, AU - Esmaillzadeh,Ahmad, PY - 2018/5/16/entrez PY - 2018/5/16/pubmed PY - 2019/4/4/medline KW - RR relative risk KW - Anxiety KW - Depression KW - Fruit KW - Meta-analyses KW - Vegetables SP - 1087 EP - 1101 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 119 IS - 10 N2 - Findings from observational studies investigating the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of depression were inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise available data on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and depression. A systematic literature search of relevant reports published in Medline/PubMed, ISI (Web of Science), SCOPUS and Google Scholar until Oct 2017 was conducted. Data from 27 publications (sixteen cross-sectional, nine cohort and two case-control studies) on fruit, vegetables and/or total fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to depression were included in the systematic review. A total of eighteen studies that reported relative risks (RR), hazard ratios or OR for the relationship were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR for depression in the highest v. the lowest category of fruit intake was 0·83 (95 % CI 0·71, 0·98) in cohort studies and 0·76 (95 % CI 0·63, 0·92) in cross-sectional studies. Consumption of vegetables was also associated with a 14 % lower risk of depression (overall RR=0·86; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·98) in cohort studies and a 25 % lower risk of depression (overall RR=0·75; 95 % CI 0·62, 0·91) in cross-sectional studies. Moreover, an inverse significant association was observed between intake of total fruit and vegetables and risk of depression (overall RR=0·80; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·98) in cross-sectional studies. In a non-linear dose-response association, we failed to find any significant association between fruit or vegetable intake and risk of depression (fruit (cross-sectional studies): P non-linearty=0·12; vegetables (cross-sectional studies): P non-linearty<0·001; (cohort studies) P non-linearty=0·97). Meta-regression of included observational studies revealed an inverse linear association between fruit or vegetable intake and risk of depression, such that every 100-g increased intake of fruit was associated with a 3 % reduced risk of depression in cohort studies (RR=0·97; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·99). With regard to vegetable consumption, every 100-g increase in intake was associated with a 3 % reduced risk of depression in cohort studies (RR=0·97; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·98) and 5 % reduced odds in cross-sectional studies (RR=0·95; 95 % CI 0·91, 0·98). This meta-analysis of observational studies provides further evidence that fruit and vegetable intake was protectively associated with depression. This finding supports the current recommendation of increasing fruit and vegetable intake to improve mental health. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29759102/Fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_and_risk_of_depression:_accumulative_evidence_from_an_updated_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_epidemiological_studies_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114518000697/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -