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Linking fish tolerance to water quality criteria for the assessment of environmental flows: A practical method for streamflow regulation and pollution control.
Water Res. 2018 Sep 15; 141:96-108.WR

Abstract

The survival of aquatic biota in stream ecosystems depends on both water quantity and quality, and is particularly susceptible to degraded water quality in regulated rivers. Maintenance of environmental flows (e-flows) for aquatic biota with optimum water quantity and quality is essential for sustainable ecosystem services, especially in developing regions with insufficient stream monitoring of hydrology, water quality and aquatic biota. Few e-flow methods are available that closely link aquatic biota tolerances to pollutant concentrations in a simple and practical manner. In this paper a new method was proposed to assess e-flows that aimed to satisfy the requirements of aquatic biota for both the quantity and quality of the streamflow by linking fish tolerances to water quality criteria, or the allowable concentration of pollutants. For better operation of water projects and control of pollutants discharged into streams, this paper presented two coefficients for streamflow adjustment and pollutant control. Assessment of e-flows in the Wei River, the largest tributary of the Yellow River, shows that streamflow in dry seasons failed to meet e-flow requirements. Pollutant influx exerted a large pressure on the aquatic ecosystem, with pollutant concentrations much higher than that of the fish tolerance thresholds. We found that both flow velocity and water temperature exerted great influences on the pollutant degradation rate. Flow velocity had a much greater influence on pollutant degradation than did the standard deviation of flow velocity. This study provides new methods to closely link the tolerance of aquatic biota to water quality criteria for e-flow assessment. The recommended coefficients for streamflow adjustment and pollutant control, to dynamically regulate streamflow and control pollutant discharge, are helpful for river management and ecosystems rehabilitation. The relatively low data requirement also makes the method easy to use efficiently in developing regions, and thus this study has significant implications for managing flows in polluted and regulated rivers worldwide.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Water Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, PR China.College of Water Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, PR China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, 518055, PR China.College of Water Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, PR China; Institute of Geographical Science and Natural Resources Research, CAS, Beijing, 100101, PR China. Electronic address: pacorrespondence@126.com.College of Water Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, PR China.Institute of Geographical Science and Natural Resources Research, CAS, Beijing, 100101, PR China.Dongying Bureau of Hydrology and Water Resources, Dongying, 257000, PR China.Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Earth Surface System and Environmental Carrying Capacity, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Northwest University, Xi'an, 710127, PR China.Applied Ecology Team, School of the Environment, University of Technology Sydney, NSW, 2007, Australia.School of the Environment, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29778871

Citation

Zhao, Changsen, et al. "Linking Fish Tolerance to Water Quality Criteria for the Assessment of Environmental Flows: a Practical Method for Streamflow Regulation and Pollution Control." Water Research, vol. 141, 2018, pp. 96-108.
Zhao C, Yang S, Liu J, et al. Linking fish tolerance to water quality criteria for the assessment of environmental flows: A practical method for streamflow regulation and pollution control. Water Res. 2018;141:96-108.
Zhao, C., Yang, S., Liu, J., Liu, C., Hao, F., Wang, Z., Zhang, H., Song, J., Mitrovic, S. M., & Lim, R. P. (2018). Linking fish tolerance to water quality criteria for the assessment of environmental flows: A practical method for streamflow regulation and pollution control. Water Research, 141, 96-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2018.05.025
Zhao C, et al. Linking Fish Tolerance to Water Quality Criteria for the Assessment of Environmental Flows: a Practical Method for Streamflow Regulation and Pollution Control. Water Res. 2018 Sep 15;141:96-108. PubMed PMID: 29778871.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Linking fish tolerance to water quality criteria for the assessment of environmental flows: A practical method for streamflow regulation and pollution control. AU - Zhao,Changsen, AU - Yang,Shengtian, AU - Liu,Junguo, AU - Liu,Changming, AU - Hao,Fanghua, AU - Wang,Zhonggen, AU - Zhang,Huitong, AU - Song,Jinxi, AU - Mitrovic,Simon M, AU - Lim,Richard P, Y1 - 2018/05/15/ PY - 2017/06/24/received PY - 2018/05/11/revised PY - 2018/05/14/accepted PY - 2018/5/21/pubmed PY - 2018/10/4/medline PY - 2018/5/21/entrez KW - Environmental flows KW - Fish tolerance KW - Streamflow regulation KW - Water pollutant control SP - 96 EP - 108 JF - Water research JO - Water Res. VL - 141 N2 - The survival of aquatic biota in stream ecosystems depends on both water quantity and quality, and is particularly susceptible to degraded water quality in regulated rivers. Maintenance of environmental flows (e-flows) for aquatic biota with optimum water quantity and quality is essential for sustainable ecosystem services, especially in developing regions with insufficient stream monitoring of hydrology, water quality and aquatic biota. Few e-flow methods are available that closely link aquatic biota tolerances to pollutant concentrations in a simple and practical manner. In this paper a new method was proposed to assess e-flows that aimed to satisfy the requirements of aquatic biota for both the quantity and quality of the streamflow by linking fish tolerances to water quality criteria, or the allowable concentration of pollutants. For better operation of water projects and control of pollutants discharged into streams, this paper presented two coefficients for streamflow adjustment and pollutant control. Assessment of e-flows in the Wei River, the largest tributary of the Yellow River, shows that streamflow in dry seasons failed to meet e-flow requirements. Pollutant influx exerted a large pressure on the aquatic ecosystem, with pollutant concentrations much higher than that of the fish tolerance thresholds. We found that both flow velocity and water temperature exerted great influences on the pollutant degradation rate. Flow velocity had a much greater influence on pollutant degradation than did the standard deviation of flow velocity. This study provides new methods to closely link the tolerance of aquatic biota to water quality criteria for e-flow assessment. The recommended coefficients for streamflow adjustment and pollutant control, to dynamically regulate streamflow and control pollutant discharge, are helpful for river management and ecosystems rehabilitation. The relatively low data requirement also makes the method easy to use efficiently in developing regions, and thus this study has significant implications for managing flows in polluted and regulated rivers worldwide. SN - 1879-2448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29778871/Linking_fish_tolerance_to_water_quality_criteria_for_the_assessment_of_environmental_flows:_A_practical_method_for_streamflow_regulation_and_pollution_control L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043-1354(18)30393-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -