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Resting energy expenditure in children with cerebral palsy: Accuracy of available prediction formulae and development of a population-specific formula.
Clin Nutr ESPEN 2018; 25:44-49CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Energy requirements are difficult to estimate in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Resting energy expenditure (REE), necessary for personalized nutritional intervention, is most commonly estimated using prediction formulae because the reference method, i.e. indirect calorimetry (IC), is not available in all Nutrition Units. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the most commonly used REE prediction formulae in children with CP. The secondary aim was to develop a new population-specific formula for the estimation of REE in children with CP.

METHODS

REE was measured by IC in 54 children and adolescents with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy (SQCP) and estimated from the five most commonly used prediction formulae, i.e. the World Health Organization (WHO), Harris-Benedict, Schofield weight, Schofield weight & height, and Oxford formulae.

RESULTS

The mean (standard deviation, SD) difference between the estimated and measured REE was 64 (238) kcal/day for the WHO formula, 79 (226) kcal/day for the Schofield weight formula, 79 (223) kcal/day for the Schofield weight and height formula, 55 (226) kcal/day for the Oxford formula, 37 (224) kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict formula and 0 (213) kcal/day for the purposely developed population-specific formula. Owing to the large SD of the bias, none of these formulae can be reliably applied at the individual level to estimate REE.

CONCLUSIONS

The most commonly used REE prediction formulas are inaccurate at both the population and individual level in children with SQCP. A purposely developed population-specific formula, despite being accurate at the population level, does not perform better than the most commonly used REE formulae at the individual level.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy. Electronic address: Francesca.Penagini@unimi.it.Pediatric Nutrition Unit, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Pediatric Nutrition Unit, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Department of Pediatrics, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Department of Pediatrics, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Department of Pediatrics, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Pediatric Orthopedic Unit, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Liver Research Center, Building Q, AREA Science Park, Strada Statale 14 km 163.5, 34012, Basovizza, Trieste, Italy.Department of Pediatrics, "V. Buzzi" Children's Hospital, University of Milan, Via Castelvetro 32, 20154 Milan, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29779817

Citation

Penagini, Francesca, et al. "Resting Energy Expenditure in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Accuracy of Available Prediction Formulae and Development of a Population-specific Formula." Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, vol. 25, 2018, pp. 44-49.
Penagini F, Borsani B, Bosetti A, et al. Resting energy expenditure in children with cerebral palsy: Accuracy of available prediction formulae and development of a population-specific formula. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2018;25:44-49.
Penagini, F., Borsani, B., Bosetti, A., Mameli, C., Dilillo, D., Ramponi, G., ... Zuccotti, G. V. (2018). Resting energy expenditure in children with cerebral palsy: Accuracy of available prediction formulae and development of a population-specific formula. Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, 25, pp. 44-49. doi:10.1016/j.clnesp.2018.04.006.
Penagini F, et al. Resting Energy Expenditure in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Accuracy of Available Prediction Formulae and Development of a Population-specific Formula. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2018;25:44-49. PubMed PMID: 29779817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resting energy expenditure in children with cerebral palsy: Accuracy of available prediction formulae and development of a population-specific formula. AU - Penagini,Francesca, AU - Borsani,Barbara, AU - Bosetti,Alessandra, AU - Mameli,Chiara, AU - Dilillo,Dario, AU - Ramponi,Giulia, AU - Motta,Francesco, AU - Bedogni,Giorgio, AU - Zuccotti,Gian Vincenzo, Y1 - 2018/04/19/ PY - 2017/11/16/received PY - 2018/03/18/revised PY - 2018/04/03/accepted PY - 2018/5/22/entrez PY - 2018/5/22/pubmed PY - 2019/8/6/medline KW - Cerebral palsy KW - Children KW - Indirect calorimetry KW - Prediction formulae KW - Resting energy expenditure SP - 44 EP - 49 JF - Clinical nutrition ESPEN JO - Clin Nutr ESPEN VL - 25 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Energy requirements are difficult to estimate in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Resting energy expenditure (REE), necessary for personalized nutritional intervention, is most commonly estimated using prediction formulae because the reference method, i.e. indirect calorimetry (IC), is not available in all Nutrition Units. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the most commonly used REE prediction formulae in children with CP. The secondary aim was to develop a new population-specific formula for the estimation of REE in children with CP. METHODS: REE was measured by IC in 54 children and adolescents with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy (SQCP) and estimated from the five most commonly used prediction formulae, i.e. the World Health Organization (WHO), Harris-Benedict, Schofield weight, Schofield weight & height, and Oxford formulae. RESULTS: The mean (standard deviation, SD) difference between the estimated and measured REE was 64 (238) kcal/day for the WHO formula, 79 (226) kcal/day for the Schofield weight formula, 79 (223) kcal/day for the Schofield weight and height formula, 55 (226) kcal/day for the Oxford formula, 37 (224) kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict formula and 0 (213) kcal/day for the purposely developed population-specific formula. Owing to the large SD of the bias, none of these formulae can be reliably applied at the individual level to estimate REE. CONCLUSIONS: The most commonly used REE prediction formulas are inaccurate at both the population and individual level in children with SQCP. A purposely developed population-specific formula, despite being accurate at the population level, does not perform better than the most commonly used REE formulae at the individual level. SN - 2405-4577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29779817/Resting_energy_expenditure_in_children_with_cerebral_palsy:_Accuracy_of_available_prediction_formulae_and_development_of_a_population_specific_formula_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2405-4577(17)30491-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -