Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Heavy metal pollution caused by small-scale metal ore mining activities: A case study from a polymetallic mine in South China.
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Oct 15; 639:217-227.ST

Abstract

Although metal ore mining activities are well known as an important source of heavy metals, soil pollution caused by small-scale mining activities has long been overlooked. This study investigated the pollution of surface soils in an area surrounding a recently abandoned small-scale polymetallic mining district in Guangdong province of south China. A total of 13 tailing samples, 145 surface soil samples, and 29 water samples were collected, and the concentrations of major heavy metals, including Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, and Se, were determined. The results show that the tailings contained high levels of heavy metals, with Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb occurring in the ranges of 739-4.15 × 103, 1.81 × 103-5.00 × 103, 118-1.26 × 103, 8.14-57.7, and 1.23 × 103-6.99 × 103 mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metals also occurred at high concentrations in the mine drainages (15.4-17.9 mg/L for Cu, 21.1-29.3 mg/L for Zn, 0.553-0.770 mg/L for Cd, and 1.17-2.57 mg/L for Pb), particularly those with pH below 3. The mean contents of Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb in the surface soils of local farmlands were up to 7 times higher than the corresponding background values, and results of multivariate statistical analysis clearly indicate that Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were largely contributed by the mining activities. The surface soils from farmlands surrounding the mining district were moderately to seriously polluted, while the potential ecological risk of heavy metal pollution was extremely high. It was estimated that the input fluxes from the mining district to the surrounding farmlands were approximately 17.1, 59.2, 0.311, and 93.8 kg/ha/yr for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb, respectively, which probably occurred through transport of fine tailings by wind and runoff, and mine drainage as well. These findings indicate the significant need for proper containment of the mine tailings at small-scale metal ore mines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.MOE Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.MOE Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.MOE Laboratory of Groundwater Circulation and Evolution, School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083, China.MOE Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. Electronic address: hefac@umich.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29787905

Citation

Sun, Zehang, et al. "Heavy Metal Pollution Caused By Small-scale Metal Ore Mining Activities: a Case Study From a Polymetallic Mine in South China." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 639, 2018, pp. 217-227.
Sun Z, Xie X, Wang P, et al. Heavy metal pollution caused by small-scale metal ore mining activities: A case study from a polymetallic mine in South China. Sci Total Environ. 2018;639:217-227.
Sun, Z., Xie, X., Wang, P., Hu, Y., & Cheng, H. (2018). Heavy metal pollution caused by small-scale metal ore mining activities: A case study from a polymetallic mine in South China. The Science of the Total Environment, 639, 217-227. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.176
Sun Z, et al. Heavy Metal Pollution Caused By Small-scale Metal Ore Mining Activities: a Case Study From a Polymetallic Mine in South China. Sci Total Environ. 2018 Oct 15;639:217-227. PubMed PMID: 29787905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy metal pollution caused by small-scale metal ore mining activities: A case study from a polymetallic mine in South China. AU - Sun,Zehang, AU - Xie,Xiande, AU - Wang,Ping, AU - Hu,Yuanan, AU - Cheng,Hefa, Y1 - 2018/05/26/ PY - 2018/03/15/received PY - 2018/05/09/revised PY - 2018/05/14/accepted PY - 2018/5/23/pubmed PY - 2019/2/2/medline PY - 2018/5/23/entrez KW - Heavy metals KW - Mine tailings KW - Small-scale mining activities KW - Soil pollution KW - Water pollution SP - 217 EP - 227 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 639 N2 - Although metal ore mining activities are well known as an important source of heavy metals, soil pollution caused by small-scale mining activities has long been overlooked. This study investigated the pollution of surface soils in an area surrounding a recently abandoned small-scale polymetallic mining district in Guangdong province of south China. A total of 13 tailing samples, 145 surface soil samples, and 29 water samples were collected, and the concentrations of major heavy metals, including Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, and Se, were determined. The results show that the tailings contained high levels of heavy metals, with Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb occurring in the ranges of 739-4.15 × 103, 1.81 × 103-5.00 × 103, 118-1.26 × 103, 8.14-57.7, and 1.23 × 103-6.99 × 103 mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metals also occurred at high concentrations in the mine drainages (15.4-17.9 mg/L for Cu, 21.1-29.3 mg/L for Zn, 0.553-0.770 mg/L for Cd, and 1.17-2.57 mg/L for Pb), particularly those with pH below 3. The mean contents of Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb in the surface soils of local farmlands were up to 7 times higher than the corresponding background values, and results of multivariate statistical analysis clearly indicate that Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were largely contributed by the mining activities. The surface soils from farmlands surrounding the mining district were moderately to seriously polluted, while the potential ecological risk of heavy metal pollution was extremely high. It was estimated that the input fluxes from the mining district to the surrounding farmlands were approximately 17.1, 59.2, 0.311, and 93.8 kg/ha/yr for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb, respectively, which probably occurred through transport of fine tailings by wind and runoff, and mine drainage as well. These findings indicate the significant need for proper containment of the mine tailings at small-scale metal ore mines. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29787905/Heavy_metal_pollution_caused_by_small_scale_metal_ore_mining_activities:_A_case_study_from_a_polymetallic_mine_in_South_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(18)31823-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -