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Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection?
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2018 05; 25(3):274-280.AC

Abstract

Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that magnesium deficiency leads to hypertension, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Given that cardiovascular disease and CKD share similar risk factors, the low magnesium status may also contribute to CKD progression. In fact, lower serum magnesium levels and lower dietary magnesium intake are associated with an increased risk of incident CKD and progression to end-stage kidney disease. Because these associations are independent of traditional risk factors, other pathways might be involved in the relationship between magnesium deficiency and the risk of CKD progression. Recent evidence has shown that magnesium suppresses phosphate-induced vascular calcification. Magnesium impairs the crystallization of calcium phosphate-more specifically, the maturation of calciprotein particles. Considering that phosphate overload causes kidney damage, magnesium might counteract the phosphate toxicity to the kidney, as in the case of vascular calcification. This hypothesis is supported by an in vitro observation that magnesium alleviates proximal tubular cell injury induced by high phosphate. Potential usefulness of magnesium as a treatment option for phosphate toxicity in CKD should be further investigated by intervention studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Comprehensive Kidney Disease Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan and Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan. Electronic address: sakaguchi@kid.med.osaka-u.ac.jp.Department of Comprehensive Kidney Disease Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan and Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.Department of Comprehensive Kidney Disease Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan and Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29793667

Citation

Sakaguchi, Yusuke, et al. "Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection?" Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, vol. 25, no. 3, 2018, pp. 274-280.
Sakaguchi Y, Hamano T, Isaka Y. Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection? Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2018;25(3):274-280.
Sakaguchi, Y., Hamano, T., & Isaka, Y. (2018). Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection? Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, 25(3), 274-280. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ackd.2017.11.001
Sakaguchi Y, Hamano T, Isaka Y. Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2018;25(3):274-280. PubMed PMID: 29793667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Magnesium and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Benefits Beyond Cardiovascular Protection? AU - Sakaguchi,Yusuke, AU - Hamano,Takayuki, AU - Isaka,Yoshitaka, PY - 2017/03/22/received PY - 2017/11/12/revised PY - 2017/11/15/accepted PY - 2018/5/26/entrez PY - 2018/5/26/pubmed PY - 2019/10/8/medline KW - Calciprotein particles KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Magnesium KW - Mineral and bone disorders KW - Phosphate SP - 274 EP - 280 JF - Advances in chronic kidney disease JO - Adv Chronic Kidney Dis VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that magnesium deficiency leads to hypertension, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Given that cardiovascular disease and CKD share similar risk factors, the low magnesium status may also contribute to CKD progression. In fact, lower serum magnesium levels and lower dietary magnesium intake are associated with an increased risk of incident CKD and progression to end-stage kidney disease. Because these associations are independent of traditional risk factors, other pathways might be involved in the relationship between magnesium deficiency and the risk of CKD progression. Recent evidence has shown that magnesium suppresses phosphate-induced vascular calcification. Magnesium impairs the crystallization of calcium phosphate-more specifically, the maturation of calciprotein particles. Considering that phosphate overload causes kidney damage, magnesium might counteract the phosphate toxicity to the kidney, as in the case of vascular calcification. This hypothesis is supported by an in vitro observation that magnesium alleviates proximal tubular cell injury induced by high phosphate. Potential usefulness of magnesium as a treatment option for phosphate toxicity in CKD should be further investigated by intervention studies. SN - 1548-5609 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29793667/Magnesium_and_Progression_of_Chronic_Kidney_Disease:_Benefits_Beyond_Cardiovascular_Protection DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -