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Does dual-task training improve spatiotemporal gait parameters in Parkinson's disease?
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018 10; 55:86-91.PR

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The DUALITY trial recently showed that both integrated and consecutive dual-task training improve dual-task gait velocity, without increasing fall risks in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Gait velocity was the primary outcome; not reported, however, were important gait measures related to the risk of falling such as gait variability. In this secondary analysis, we compared the efficacy of the two training programs with respect to spatiotemporal outcome parameters.

METHODS

121 PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage II-III while ON medication) were randomly assigned to either a consecutive group (n = 65) in which cognitive and gait tasks were trained separately, or an integrated group (n = 56) in which cognitive and gait tasks were trained simultaneously. Both groups received 24 in-home physiotherapy sessions for six consecutive weeks. Two baseline measurements were performed during a six-week control period prior to the interventions. Gait was evaluated under three different (and untrained) dual-task conditions immediately after the treatment period and at 12-week follow-up.

RESULTS

Both training modalities had a comparable effect on spatiotemporal gait parameters. A significant post-training increase in stride length (P < .001) and cadence (P < .001) was found under both the single and the dual-task conditions. These improvements were maintained at follow-up, although the effect was slightly reduced. No significant changes were found for gait variability under single and dual-task conditions.

CONCLUSION

We found both integrated and consecutive dual-task training to be safe and effective in improving several spatiotemporal gait parameters under trained and untrained dual-task conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuromotor and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Center (CRRNC), Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: christian.geroin@univr.it.Radboud University Medical Center, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Rehabilitation, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Jorik.Nonnekes@radboudumc.nl.Radboud University Medical Center, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Neurology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Nienke.deVries-Farrouh@radboudumc.nl.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Rehabilitation Research Center (REVAL), Biomedical Research Institute (BiOMED), Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Belgium. Electronic address: carolien.strouwen@gmail.com.Neuromotor and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Center (CRRNC), Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; Neurorehabilitation Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.smania@univr.it.Neurology Unit, Movement Disorders Division, Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: michele.tinazzi@univr.it.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Alice.Nieuwboer@kuleuven.be.Radboud University Medical Center, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Neurology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Bas.Bloem@radboudumc.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29802080

Citation

Geroin, Christian, et al. "Does Dual-task Training Improve Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Parkinson's Disease?" Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, vol. 55, 2018, pp. 86-91.
Geroin C, Nonnekes J, de Vries NM, et al. Does dual-task training improve spatiotemporal gait parameters in Parkinson's disease? Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018;55:86-91.
Geroin, C., Nonnekes, J., de Vries, N. M., Strouwen, C., Smania, N., Tinazzi, M., Nieuwboer, A., & Bloem, B. R. (2018). Does dual-task training improve spatiotemporal gait parameters in Parkinson's disease? Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, 55, 86-91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2018.05.018
Geroin C, et al. Does Dual-task Training Improve Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Parkinson's Disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018;55:86-91. PubMed PMID: 29802080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does dual-task training improve spatiotemporal gait parameters in Parkinson's disease? AU - Geroin,Christian, AU - Nonnekes,Jorik, AU - de Vries,Nienke M, AU - Strouwen,Carolien, AU - Smania,Nicola, AU - Tinazzi,Michele, AU - Nieuwboer,Alice, AU - Bloem,Bastiaan R, Y1 - 2018/05/18/ PY - 2018/02/19/received PY - 2018/04/30/revised PY - 2018/05/15/accepted PY - 2018/5/29/pubmed PY - 2019/9/10/medline PY - 2018/5/27/entrez KW - Dual-task KW - Gait KW - Parkinson's disease KW - Physical therapy KW - Postural control SP - 86 EP - 91 JF - Parkinsonism & related disorders JO - Parkinsonism Relat Disord VL - 55 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The DUALITY trial recently showed that both integrated and consecutive dual-task training improve dual-task gait velocity, without increasing fall risks in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Gait velocity was the primary outcome; not reported, however, were important gait measures related to the risk of falling such as gait variability. In this secondary analysis, we compared the efficacy of the two training programs with respect to spatiotemporal outcome parameters. METHODS: 121 PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage II-III while ON medication) were randomly assigned to either a consecutive group (n = 65) in which cognitive and gait tasks were trained separately, or an integrated group (n = 56) in which cognitive and gait tasks were trained simultaneously. Both groups received 24 in-home physiotherapy sessions for six consecutive weeks. Two baseline measurements were performed during a six-week control period prior to the interventions. Gait was evaluated under three different (and untrained) dual-task conditions immediately after the treatment period and at 12-week follow-up. RESULTS: Both training modalities had a comparable effect on spatiotemporal gait parameters. A significant post-training increase in stride length (P < .001) and cadence (P < .001) was found under both the single and the dual-task conditions. These improvements were maintained at follow-up, although the effect was slightly reduced. No significant changes were found for gait variability under single and dual-task conditions. CONCLUSION: We found both integrated and consecutive dual-task training to be safe and effective in improving several spatiotemporal gait parameters under trained and untrained dual-task conditions. SN - 1873-5126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29802080/Does_dual_task_training_improve_spatiotemporal_gait_parameters_in_Parkinson's_disease L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1353-8020(18)30250-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -