Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Volatile and sensory profiling of Shiraz wine in response to alcohol management: comparison of harvest timing versus technological approaches.
Food Res Int. 2018 07; 109:561-571.FR

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the volatile and sensory profiles of Australian Shiraz red wines produced by several methods to achieve alcohol concentrations of 10.5 and 13.5% v/v. These levels were considerably lower contents than the commercial wine (16-17% v/v) that was produced from this vineyard site. Wines were produced by: (i) harvest timing (19.3, 24 and 29.3 Brix); (ii) blending equal proportions of early harvest (19.3 Brix) and late harvest wines (29.3 Brix); and (iii) dealcoholization using reverse osmosis followed by a membrane contactor. Dealcoholization caused a significant loss of volatile compounds, particularly esters, while the blending treatment had an averaging effect on most analytes. Sensory descriptive analysis of treatments with 10.5% v/v alcohol showed that the perception of the herbaceous attribute was more intense in the early harvest wines in comparison to the dealcoholized wines, while those of dark fruit, raisin/prune, astringency and alcohol were lower. No sensory differences were found amongst the 13.5% v/v wines, except for alcohol. Sensory and compositional data were modelled by means of Common Dimension (ComDim) multi-block analysis and indicated which chemical components are important to the perceived wine sensory properties. Insights from this study will provide knowledge that may be applied to control or moderate both unripe sensory attributes in addition to a deficiency of ripe fruit aromas or mouthfeel characteristics in reduced-alcohol red wines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia; School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia; Australian Research Council-Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia. Electronic address: rocco.longo@utas.edu.au.National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia; School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia; Australian Research Council-Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia.School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia.Australian Research Council-Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia; School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia.National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia; Australian Research Council-Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia; NSW Department of Primary Industries, Wagga Wagga, Australia.National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia; School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia; Australian Research Council-Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29803484

Citation

Longo, Rocco, et al. "Volatile and Sensory Profiling of Shiraz Wine in Response to Alcohol Management: Comparison of Harvest Timing Versus Technological Approaches." Food Research International (Ottawa, Ont.), vol. 109, 2018, pp. 561-571.
Longo R, Blackman JW, Antalick G, et al. Volatile and sensory profiling of Shiraz wine in response to alcohol management: comparison of harvest timing versus technological approaches. Food Res Int. 2018;109:561-571.
Longo, R., Blackman, J. W., Antalick, G., Torley, P. J., Rogiers, S. Y., & Schmidtke, L. M. (2018). Volatile and sensory profiling of Shiraz wine in response to alcohol management: comparison of harvest timing versus technological approaches. Food Research International (Ottawa, Ont.), 109, 561-571. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2018.04.057
Longo R, et al. Volatile and Sensory Profiling of Shiraz Wine in Response to Alcohol Management: Comparison of Harvest Timing Versus Technological Approaches. Food Res Int. 2018;109:561-571. PubMed PMID: 29803484.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Volatile and sensory profiling of Shiraz wine in response to alcohol management: comparison of harvest timing versus technological approaches. AU - Longo,Rocco, AU - Blackman,John W, AU - Antalick,Guillaume, AU - Torley,Peter J, AU - Rogiers,Suzy Y, AU - Schmidtke,Leigh M, Y1 - 2018/04/27/ PY - 2018/01/16/received PY - 2018/04/03/revised PY - 2018/04/25/accepted PY - 2018/5/28/entrez PY - 2018/5/29/pubmed PY - 2019/10/8/medline KW - Common Component Specific Weights Analysis KW - polypropylene membrane KW - sensory descriptive analysis KW - sequential harvest KW - volatiles KW - wine alcohol-reduction SP - 561 EP - 571 JF - Food research international (Ottawa, Ont.) JO - Food Res Int VL - 109 N2 - The aim of this study was to compare the volatile and sensory profiles of Australian Shiraz red wines produced by several methods to achieve alcohol concentrations of 10.5 and 13.5% v/v. These levels were considerably lower contents than the commercial wine (16-17% v/v) that was produced from this vineyard site. Wines were produced by: (i) harvest timing (19.3, 24 and 29.3 Brix); (ii) blending equal proportions of early harvest (19.3 Brix) and late harvest wines (29.3 Brix); and (iii) dealcoholization using reverse osmosis followed by a membrane contactor. Dealcoholization caused a significant loss of volatile compounds, particularly esters, while the blending treatment had an averaging effect on most analytes. Sensory descriptive analysis of treatments with 10.5% v/v alcohol showed that the perception of the herbaceous attribute was more intense in the early harvest wines in comparison to the dealcoholized wines, while those of dark fruit, raisin/prune, astringency and alcohol were lower. No sensory differences were found amongst the 13.5% v/v wines, except for alcohol. Sensory and compositional data were modelled by means of Common Dimension (ComDim) multi-block analysis and indicated which chemical components are important to the perceived wine sensory properties. Insights from this study will provide knowledge that may be applied to control or moderate both unripe sensory attributes in addition to a deficiency of ripe fruit aromas or mouthfeel characteristics in reduced-alcohol red wines. SN - 1873-7145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29803484/Volatile_and_sensory_profiling_of_Shiraz_wine_in_response_to_alcohol_management:_comparison_of_harvest_timing_versus_technological_approaches_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0963-9969(18)30341-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -