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Associations of maternal exposure to triclosan, parabens, and other phenols with prenatal maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone levels.
Environ Res. 2018 08; 165:379-386.ER

Abstract

Environmental phenols and parabens are commonly used in personal care products and other consumer products and human exposure to these chemicals is widespread. Although human and animal studies suggest an association between exposure to phenols and parabens and thyroid hormone levels, few studies have investigated the association of in utero exposure to these chemicals and thyroid hormones in pregnant women and their neonates. We measured four environmental phenols (triclosan, benzophenone-3, and 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol), and three parabens (methyl-, propyl-, and butyl paraben) in urine collected from mothers at two time points during pregnancy as part of the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study. We measured free thyroxine (T4), total T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in serum of the pregnant women (N = 454) and TSH in their neonates (N = 365). We examined potential confounding by a large number of additional chemical exposures and used Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to select the most influential chemicals to include in regression models. We observed negative associations of prenatal urinary concentrations of propyl paraben and maternal TSH (β for two-fold increase = -3.26%, 95% CI: -5.55, -0.90) and negative associations of 2,4-dichlorophenol and maternal free T4 (β for two-fold increase = -0.05, 95% CI: -0.08, -0.02), after controlling for other chemical exposures. We observed negative associations of triclosan with maternal total T4 after controlling for demographic variables, but this association became non-significant after controlling for other chemicals (β for two-fold increase = -0.05, 95% CI: -0.11, 0.00). We found evidence that environmental phenols and parabens are associated with lower TSH and free T4 in pregnant women after controlling for related chemical exposures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA. Electronic address: kharley@berkeley.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29803919

Citation

Berger, Kimberly, et al. "Associations of Maternal Exposure to Triclosan, Parabens, and Other Phenols With Prenatal Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Hormone Levels." Environmental Research, vol. 165, 2018, pp. 379-386.
Berger K, Gunier RB, Chevrier J, et al. Associations of maternal exposure to triclosan, parabens, and other phenols with prenatal maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone levels. Environ Res. 2018;165:379-386.
Berger, K., Gunier, R. B., Chevrier, J., Calafat, A. M., Ye, X., Eskenazi, B., & Harley, K. G. (2018). Associations of maternal exposure to triclosan, parabens, and other phenols with prenatal maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone levels. Environmental Research, 165, 379-386. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.05.005
Berger K, et al. Associations of Maternal Exposure to Triclosan, Parabens, and Other Phenols With Prenatal Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Hormone Levels. Environ Res. 2018;165:379-386. PubMed PMID: 29803919.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of maternal exposure to triclosan, parabens, and other phenols with prenatal maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone levels. AU - Berger,Kimberly, AU - Gunier,Robert B, AU - Chevrier,Jonathan, AU - Calafat,Antonia M, AU - Ye,Xiaoyun, AU - Eskenazi,Brenda, AU - Harley,Kim G, Y1 - 2018/05/25/ PY - 2018/03/08/received PY - 2018/04/24/revised PY - 2018/05/07/accepted PY - 2018/5/29/pubmed PY - 2019/9/7/medline PY - 2018/5/28/entrez KW - Parabens KW - Phenols KW - Thyroid hormone KW - Triclosan KW - in utero exposure SP - 379 EP - 386 JF - Environmental research JO - Environ. Res. VL - 165 N2 - Environmental phenols and parabens are commonly used in personal care products and other consumer products and human exposure to these chemicals is widespread. Although human and animal studies suggest an association between exposure to phenols and parabens and thyroid hormone levels, few studies have investigated the association of in utero exposure to these chemicals and thyroid hormones in pregnant women and their neonates. We measured four environmental phenols (triclosan, benzophenone-3, and 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol), and three parabens (methyl-, propyl-, and butyl paraben) in urine collected from mothers at two time points during pregnancy as part of the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study. We measured free thyroxine (T4), total T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in serum of the pregnant women (N = 454) and TSH in their neonates (N = 365). We examined potential confounding by a large number of additional chemical exposures and used Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to select the most influential chemicals to include in regression models. We observed negative associations of prenatal urinary concentrations of propyl paraben and maternal TSH (β for two-fold increase = -3.26%, 95% CI: -5.55, -0.90) and negative associations of 2,4-dichlorophenol and maternal free T4 (β for two-fold increase = -0.05, 95% CI: -0.08, -0.02), after controlling for other chemical exposures. We observed negative associations of triclosan with maternal total T4 after controlling for demographic variables, but this association became non-significant after controlling for other chemicals (β for two-fold increase = -0.05, 95% CI: -0.11, 0.00). We found evidence that environmental phenols and parabens are associated with lower TSH and free T4 in pregnant women after controlling for related chemical exposures. SN - 1096-0953 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29803919/Associations_of_maternal_exposure_to_triclosan_parabens_and_other_phenols_with_prenatal_maternal_and_neonatal_thyroid_hormone_levels_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0013-9351(18)30244-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -