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Effects of aged ZnO NPs and soil type on Zn availability, accumulation and toxicity to pea and beet in a greenhouse experiment.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 Sep 30; 160:222-230.EE

Abstract

Most studies have assessed the toxicity of pristine NPs to plants without considering the likely changes that these NPs will undergo during their residence time in the soil. In this study, we assessed the effects of ZnO NPs (3, 20, and 225 mg Zn kg-1 soil) aged for a year in soil and after a previous crop on the Zn availability in soil, leaf accumulation and toxicity to green pea (Pisum sativum L.) and beet root (Beta vulgaris L). The effects were compared to bulk ZnO and ZnSO4 in two agricultural soils with different pH under greenhouse conditions. The Zn concentration in the plant leaf was 6-12-fold higher in acidic than in calcareous soil that could explain the different effects on plants caused by Zn applications depending on soil type. Thus, in acidic soil, ZnO NPs promoted ROS generation in both plant species with increases from 47% to 130%, increased the MDA content in pea up to 58 ± 8% in plant exposed to ZnSO4 at 225 mg Zn kg-1 soil and altered the ratio of photosynthetic pigments in beet between 12% and 41%, suggesting distressed chloroplast constituents. In calcareous soil, the changes seemed to be related to the supply of Zn in Zn deficient soils, whose principal effect was the 20-65% decrease of ROS levels in treated plants. The available and leaf Zn concentrations did not differ among Zn sources. Likewise, ZnO NPs showed comparable toxic or stimulatory effects to ZnO bulk and Zn salt, with some exceptions where Zn ion showed the highest phytotoxicity and effectiveness as a micronutrient. According to our results, we cannot affirm that NPs pose a higher potential environmental risk than their bulk counterparts after one-year of residence time in soil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: cgarcia@inia.es.Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: sandra.garcia@inia.es.Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Chemical & Food Technology Department, Ciudad Universitaria, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: ana.obrador@upm.es.Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Chemical & Food Technology Department, Ciudad Universitaria, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: demetrio.gonzalez@upm.es.Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: babin@inia.es.Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: mdfdez@inia.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29807295

Citation

García-Gómez, Concepción, et al. "Effects of Aged ZnO NPs and Soil Type On Zn Availability, Accumulation and Toxicity to Pea and Beet in a Greenhouse Experiment." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 160, 2018, pp. 222-230.
García-Gómez C, García S, Obrador AF, et al. Effects of aged ZnO NPs and soil type on Zn availability, accumulation and toxicity to pea and beet in a greenhouse experiment. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018;160:222-230.
García-Gómez, C., García, S., Obrador, A. F., González, D., Babín, M., & Fernández, M. D. (2018). Effects of aged ZnO NPs and soil type on Zn availability, accumulation and toxicity to pea and beet in a greenhouse experiment. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 160, 222-230. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.05.019
García-Gómez C, et al. Effects of Aged ZnO NPs and Soil Type On Zn Availability, Accumulation and Toxicity to Pea and Beet in a Greenhouse Experiment. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 Sep 30;160:222-230. PubMed PMID: 29807295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of aged ZnO NPs and soil type on Zn availability, accumulation and toxicity to pea and beet in a greenhouse experiment. AU - García-Gómez,Concepción, AU - García,Sandra, AU - Obrador,Ana Francisca, AU - González,Demetrio, AU - Babín,Mar, AU - Fernández,María Dolores, Y1 - 2018/05/26/ PY - 2017/10/02/received PY - 2018/05/07/revised PY - 2018/05/10/accepted PY - 2018/5/29/pubmed PY - 2018/9/25/medline PY - 2018/5/29/entrez KW - Aged ZnO nanoparticles KW - Greenhouse KW - Long-term toxicity KW - Plant oxidative stress KW - Soil pH KW - Zn accumulation SP - 222 EP - 230 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol Environ Saf VL - 160 N2 - Most studies have assessed the toxicity of pristine NPs to plants without considering the likely changes that these NPs will undergo during their residence time in the soil. In this study, we assessed the effects of ZnO NPs (3, 20, and 225 mg Zn kg-1 soil) aged for a year in soil and after a previous crop on the Zn availability in soil, leaf accumulation and toxicity to green pea (Pisum sativum L.) and beet root (Beta vulgaris L). The effects were compared to bulk ZnO and ZnSO4 in two agricultural soils with different pH under greenhouse conditions. The Zn concentration in the plant leaf was 6-12-fold higher in acidic than in calcareous soil that could explain the different effects on plants caused by Zn applications depending on soil type. Thus, in acidic soil, ZnO NPs promoted ROS generation in both plant species with increases from 47% to 130%, increased the MDA content in pea up to 58 ± 8% in plant exposed to ZnSO4 at 225 mg Zn kg-1 soil and altered the ratio of photosynthetic pigments in beet between 12% and 41%, suggesting distressed chloroplast constituents. In calcareous soil, the changes seemed to be related to the supply of Zn in Zn deficient soils, whose principal effect was the 20-65% decrease of ROS levels in treated plants. The available and leaf Zn concentrations did not differ among Zn sources. Likewise, ZnO NPs showed comparable toxic or stimulatory effects to ZnO bulk and Zn salt, with some exceptions where Zn ion showed the highest phytotoxicity and effectiveness as a micronutrient. According to our results, we cannot affirm that NPs pose a higher potential environmental risk than their bulk counterparts after one-year of residence time in soil. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29807295/Effects_of_aged_ZnO_NPs_and_soil_type_on_Zn_availability_accumulation_and_toxicity_to_pea_and_beet_in_a_greenhouse_experiment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(18)30396-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -