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Adequacy of nutritional intake during pregnancy in relation to prepregnancy BMI: results from the 3D Cohort Study.
Br J Nutr. 2018 08; 120(3):335-344.BJ

Abstract

Our study compares adequacy of nutritional intakes among pregnant women with different prepregnancy BMI and explores associations between nutritional intakes during pregnancy and both prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG). We collected dietary information from a large cohort of pregnant Canadian women (n 861) using a 3-d food record. We estimated usual dietary intakes of energy (E), macronutrients and micronutrients using the National Cancer Institute method. We also performed Pearson's correlations between nutritional intakes and both prepregnancy BMI and GWG. In all BMI categories, intakes considered suboptimal (by comparison with estimated average requirements) were noted for Fe, vitamin D, folate, vitamin B6, Mg, Zn, Ca and vitamin A. Total fat intakes were above the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) for 36 % of the women. A higher proportion of obese women had carbohydrate intakes (as %E) below the AMDR (v. normal-weight and overweight women; 19 v. 9 %) and Na intakes above the tolerable upper intake level (v. other BMI categories; 90 v. 77-78 %). In all BMI categories, median intakes of K and fibre were below adequate intake. Intakes of several nutrients (adjusted for energy) were correlated with BMI. Correlations were detected between energy-adjusted nutrient intakes and total GWG and were, for the most part, specific to certain BMI categories. Overweight and obese pregnant women appear to be the most nutritionally vulnerable. Nutrition interventions are needed to guide pregnant women toward their optimal GWG while also meeting their nutritional requirements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1School of Epidemiology and Public Health,University of Ottawa,Ottawa,ON, Canada K1G 5Z3.1School of Epidemiology and Public Health,University of Ottawa,Ottawa,ON, Canada K1G 5Z3.1School of Epidemiology and Public Health,University of Ottawa,Ottawa,ON, Canada K1G 5Z3.2Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Centre,University of Montreal,Montreal,QC, Canada H3T 1C5.4School of Nutrition Sciences,University of Ottawa,Ottawa,ON, Canada K1N 6N5.6Departments of Pediatrics and Psychology,University of Montreal,Montreal,QC, Canada H3T 1J7.2Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Centre,University of Montreal,Montreal,QC, Canada H3T 1C5.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29875026

Citation

Dubois, Lise, et al. "Adequacy of Nutritional Intake During Pregnancy in Relation to Prepregnancy BMI: Results From the 3D Cohort Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 120, no. 3, 2018, pp. 335-344.
Dubois L, Diasparra M, Bédard B, et al. Adequacy of nutritional intake during pregnancy in relation to prepregnancy BMI: results from the 3D Cohort Study. Br J Nutr. 2018;120(3):335-344.
Dubois, L., Diasparra, M., Bédard, B., Colapinto, C. K., Fontaine-Bisson, B., Tremblay, R. E., & Fraser, W. D. (2018). Adequacy of nutritional intake during pregnancy in relation to prepregnancy BMI: results from the 3D Cohort Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 120(3), 335-344. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114518001393
Dubois L, et al. Adequacy of Nutritional Intake During Pregnancy in Relation to Prepregnancy BMI: Results From the 3D Cohort Study. Br J Nutr. 2018;120(3):335-344. PubMed PMID: 29875026.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adequacy of nutritional intake during pregnancy in relation to prepregnancy BMI: results from the 3D Cohort Study. AU - Dubois,Lise, AU - Diasparra,Maikol, AU - Bédard,Brigitte, AU - Colapinto,Cynthia K, AU - Fontaine-Bisson,Bénédicte, AU - Tremblay,Richard E, AU - Fraser,William D, Y1 - 2018/06/07/ PY - 2018/6/8/pubmed PY - 2019/9/5/medline PY - 2018/6/8/entrez KW - AMDR acceptable macronutrient distribution range KW - GWG gestational weight gain KW - IOM Institute of Medicine KW - UL tolerable upper intake level KW - Diets KW - Gestational weight gain KW - Nutrition KW - Pregnancy KW - Prepregnancy BMI SP - 335 EP - 344 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 120 IS - 3 N2 - Our study compares adequacy of nutritional intakes among pregnant women with different prepregnancy BMI and explores associations between nutritional intakes during pregnancy and both prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG). We collected dietary information from a large cohort of pregnant Canadian women (n 861) using a 3-d food record. We estimated usual dietary intakes of energy (E), macronutrients and micronutrients using the National Cancer Institute method. We also performed Pearson's correlations between nutritional intakes and both prepregnancy BMI and GWG. In all BMI categories, intakes considered suboptimal (by comparison with estimated average requirements) were noted for Fe, vitamin D, folate, vitamin B6, Mg, Zn, Ca and vitamin A. Total fat intakes were above the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR) for 36 % of the women. A higher proportion of obese women had carbohydrate intakes (as %E) below the AMDR (v. normal-weight and overweight women; 19 v. 9 %) and Na intakes above the tolerable upper intake level (v. other BMI categories; 90 v. 77-78 %). In all BMI categories, median intakes of K and fibre were below adequate intake. Intakes of several nutrients (adjusted for energy) were correlated with BMI. Correlations were detected between energy-adjusted nutrient intakes and total GWG and were, for the most part, specific to certain BMI categories. Overweight and obese pregnant women appear to be the most nutritionally vulnerable. Nutrition interventions are needed to guide pregnant women toward their optimal GWG while also meeting their nutritional requirements. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29875026/Adequacy_of_nutritional_intake_during_pregnancy_in_relation_to_prepregnancy_BMI:_results_from_the_3D_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114518001393/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -