Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Health risks of heavy metal exposure through vegetable consumption near a large-scale Pb/Zn smelter in central China.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018 10; 161:99-110.EE

Abstract

Smelting of nonferrous metals is an important source of heavy metals in surface soil. The crops/vegetables grown on contaminated soil potentially impose adverse effects on human health. In this study, the contamination level of five heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu) in ten types of vegetables grown nearby a large scale Pb/Zn smelter in Hunan Province, China and the health risk associated with their consumption are assessed. Based on the data obtained from 52 samples, we find that Pb and Cd contributed to the greatest health risk and leafy vegetables tend to be more contaminated than non-leafy vegetables. Within 4 km radius of the smelter, over 75% of vegetable samples exceeded the national food standard for Pb; over 47% exceeded the Cd standard; and 7% exceeded the Hg standard. Heavy metal concentrations in vegetables measured within the 4 km radius are on average three times more elevated compared to those found at the control area 15 km away. Heavy metals in vegetables have dual sources of root absorption from soil and leaf adsorption from atmosphere. Health risk in terms of the hazard index (HI) at contaminated areas are 3.66 and 3.14 for adults and children, respectively, suggesting adverse health effects would occur. HI for both groups are mainly contributed by Pb (48%) and Cd (40%). Fortunately, vegetable samples collected at the control area are considered safe to consume.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China. Electronic address: lizhonggen@mail.gyig.ac.cn.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China; Center for Advances in Water and Air Quality, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China.State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China. Electronic address: fengxinbin@mail.gyig.ac.cn.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550081, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29879579

Citation

Li, Xinyu, et al. "Health Risks of Heavy Metal Exposure Through Vegetable Consumption Near a Large-scale Pb/Zn Smelter in Central China." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 161, 2018, pp. 99-110.
Li X, Li Z, Lin CJ, et al. Health risks of heavy metal exposure through vegetable consumption near a large-scale Pb/Zn smelter in central China. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018;161:99-110.
Li, X., Li, Z., Lin, C. J., Bi, X., Liu, J., Feng, X., Zhang, H., Chen, J., & Wu, T. (2018). Health risks of heavy metal exposure through vegetable consumption near a large-scale Pb/Zn smelter in central China. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 161, 99-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.05.080
Li X, et al. Health Risks of Heavy Metal Exposure Through Vegetable Consumption Near a Large-scale Pb/Zn Smelter in Central China. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2018;161:99-110. PubMed PMID: 29879579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health risks of heavy metal exposure through vegetable consumption near a large-scale Pb/Zn smelter in central China. AU - Li,Xinyu, AU - Li,Zhonggen, AU - Lin,Che-Jen, AU - Bi,Xiangyang, AU - Liu,Jinling, AU - Feng,Xinbin, AU - Zhang,Hua, AU - Chen,Ji, AU - Wu,Tingting, Y1 - 2018/06/04/ PY - 2018/04/02/received PY - 2018/05/23/revised PY - 2018/05/29/accepted PY - 2018/6/8/pubmed PY - 2019/5/30/medline PY - 2018/6/8/entrez KW - Health risk KW - Heavy metal KW - Pb/Zn smelting KW - Vegetable SP - 99 EP - 110 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol Environ Saf VL - 161 N2 - Smelting of nonferrous metals is an important source of heavy metals in surface soil. The crops/vegetables grown on contaminated soil potentially impose adverse effects on human health. In this study, the contamination level of five heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu) in ten types of vegetables grown nearby a large scale Pb/Zn smelter in Hunan Province, China and the health risk associated with their consumption are assessed. Based on the data obtained from 52 samples, we find that Pb and Cd contributed to the greatest health risk and leafy vegetables tend to be more contaminated than non-leafy vegetables. Within 4 km radius of the smelter, over 75% of vegetable samples exceeded the national food standard for Pb; over 47% exceeded the Cd standard; and 7% exceeded the Hg standard. Heavy metal concentrations in vegetables measured within the 4 km radius are on average three times more elevated compared to those found at the control area 15 km away. Heavy metals in vegetables have dual sources of root absorption from soil and leaf adsorption from atmosphere. Health risk in terms of the hazard index (HI) at contaminated areas are 3.66 and 3.14 for adults and children, respectively, suggesting adverse health effects would occur. HI for both groups are mainly contributed by Pb (48%) and Cd (40%). Fortunately, vegetable samples collected at the control area are considered safe to consume. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29879579/Health_risks_of_heavy_metal_exposure_through_vegetable_consumption_near_a_large_scale_Pb/Zn_smelter_in_central_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(18)30467-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -