Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility.
Neuroradiol J. 2018 Oct; 31(5):513-517.NJ

Abstract

Purpose Transverse sinus stenosis is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It is not clear whether it is the cause or the result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension has been carried out in several prior series. Our goal was to evaluate the clinical and imaging follow-up results of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension that underwent stenting for this condition at our center. Materials and Methods We reviewed the clinical, venographic and follow-up imaging data in patients who underwent elective transverse sinus stenting during the period from 2011 to 2017. Results In total, 18 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were identified. The mean lumbar cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure recorded was 408 mmH20. Overall, 16 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent transverse sinus stenting. At venography, the mean pressure gradient across the dominant transverse sinus stenosis was 21 mmHg. The pressure gradient immediately after stenting in all of those measured was negligible. Following stenting, headaches improved in 10 of the 16 cases, with persistent headaches in four patients, one of which had persistent baseline migraines. All cases showed resolution of the papilledema on follow up. Follow-up imaging with computed tomography venography showed that the stents remained widely patent. The follow up in clinic was done for a mean period of 35.5 months. Follow up with computed tomography venography was done for a mean of 10.3 months. Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is a safe and effective procedure. It relieves papilledema in all cases and improves headaches in most cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Indiana University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, USA.Indiana University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, USA.Indiana University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, USA.Indiana University Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29882475

Citation

Koovor, Jerry Me, et al. "Transverse Venous Sinus Stenting for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Safety and Feasibility." The Neuroradiology Journal, vol. 31, no. 5, 2018, pp. 513-517.
Koovor JM, Lopez GV, Riley K, et al. Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility. Neuroradiol J. 2018;31(5):513-517.
Koovor, J. M., Lopez, G. V., Riley, K., & Tejada, J. (2018). Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility. The Neuroradiology Journal, 31(5), 513-517. https://doi.org/10.1177/1971400918782320
Koovor JM, et al. Transverse Venous Sinus Stenting for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Safety and Feasibility. Neuroradiol J. 2018;31(5):513-517. PubMed PMID: 29882475.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transverse venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Safety and feasibility. AU - Koovor,Jerry Me, AU - Lopez,Gloria V, AU - Riley,Kalen, AU - Tejada,Juan, Y1 - 2018/06/08/ PY - 2018/6/9/pubmed PY - 2018/11/6/medline PY - 2018/6/9/entrez KW - Headache KW - idiopathic intracranial hypertension KW - papilledema KW - venous sinus stenosis KW - venous sinus stenting SP - 513 EP - 517 JF - The neuroradiology journal JO - Neuroradiol J VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - Purpose Transverse sinus stenosis is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It is not clear whether it is the cause or the result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension has been carried out in several prior series. Our goal was to evaluate the clinical and imaging follow-up results of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension that underwent stenting for this condition at our center. Materials and Methods We reviewed the clinical, venographic and follow-up imaging data in patients who underwent elective transverse sinus stenting during the period from 2011 to 2017. Results In total, 18 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were identified. The mean lumbar cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure recorded was 408 mmH20. Overall, 16 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent transverse sinus stenting. At venography, the mean pressure gradient across the dominant transverse sinus stenosis was 21 mmHg. The pressure gradient immediately after stenting in all of those measured was negligible. Following stenting, headaches improved in 10 of the 16 cases, with persistent headaches in four patients, one of which had persistent baseline migraines. All cases showed resolution of the papilledema on follow up. Follow-up imaging with computed tomography venography showed that the stents remained widely patent. The follow up in clinic was done for a mean period of 35.5 months. Follow up with computed tomography venography was done for a mean of 10.3 months. Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is a safe and effective procedure. It relieves papilledema in all cases and improves headaches in most cases. SN - 2385-1996 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29882475/Transverse_venous_sinus_stenting_for_idiopathic_intracranial_hypertension:_Safety_and_feasibility_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1971400918782320?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -