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Malassezia pachydermatis from animals: Planktonic and biofilm antifungal susceptibility and its virulence arsenal.
Vet Microbiol. 2018 Jul; 220:47-52.VM

Abstract

The yeast Malassezia pachydermatis is a component of the microbiota of dogs and cats, however it can cause otitis and seborrheic dermatitis in these animals. The objective of this study was to determine the antifungal susceptibility, and evaluate virulence and pathogenicity of 25 M. pachydermatis strains from animals. Susceptibility to ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, terbinafine, and amphotericin B was evaluated by broth microdilution assay. In addition, biofilm-forming ability, protease, phospholipase, hemolysin and melanin production and adhesion to epithelial cells by this yeast species were assessed. Finally, strain pathogenicity was investigated using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Concerning the planktonic susceptibility, minimum inhibitory concentrations varied from <0.03 to>64 μg/mL for azole derivatives, 1 to >16 μg/mL for amphotericin B and 0.03 to 0.25 μg/mL for terbinafine. All strains were classified as strong biofilm producers, and ketoconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B presented the best inhibitory effect against mature biofilms. All fungal isolates produced proteases, whereas 14/25 strains were positive for phospholipase production. Hemolytic activity was not observed and 18/25 strains showed dark pigmentation in the presence of L-DOPA. Regarding adhesion to epithelial cells, a low adhesion rate was observed in 10/12 evaluated strains. C. elegans mortality rate reached 95.9% after 96 h of exposure of the worms to M. pachydermatis. This yeast species produces important virulence factors and presents high pathogenicity, corroborating its clinical importance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. Electronic address: brilhante@ufc.br.School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, Specialized Medical Mycology Center, Postgraduate Program in Medical Microbiology, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil; School of Veterinary, Postgraduate Program in Veterinary Sciences, State University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29885800

Citation

Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira, et al. "Malassezia Pachydermatis From Animals: Planktonic and Biofilm Antifungal Susceptibility and Its Virulence Arsenal." Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 220, 2018, pp. 47-52.
Brilhante RSN, Rocha MGD, Guedes GMM, et al. Malassezia pachydermatis from animals: Planktonic and biofilm antifungal susceptibility and its virulence arsenal. Vet Microbiol. 2018;220:47-52.
Brilhante, R. S. N., Rocha, M. G. D., Guedes, G. M. M., Oliveira, J. S., Araújo, G. D. S., España, J. D. A., Sales, J. A., Aguiar, L., Paiva, M. A. N., Cordeiro, R. A., Pereira-Neto, W. A., Pinheiro, A. Q., Sidrim, J. J. C., Castelo-Branco, D. S. C. M., & Rocha, M. F. G. (2018). Malassezia pachydermatis from animals: Planktonic and biofilm antifungal susceptibility and its virulence arsenal. Veterinary Microbiology, 220, 47-52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.05.003
Brilhante RSN, et al. Malassezia Pachydermatis From Animals: Planktonic and Biofilm Antifungal Susceptibility and Its Virulence Arsenal. Vet Microbiol. 2018;220:47-52. PubMed PMID: 29885800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malassezia pachydermatis from animals: Planktonic and biofilm antifungal susceptibility and its virulence arsenal. AU - Brilhante,Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira, AU - Rocha,Maria Gleiciane da, AU - Guedes,Glaucia Morgana de Melo, AU - Oliveira,Jonathas Sales de, AU - Araújo,Géssica Dos Santos, AU - España,Jaime David Acosta, AU - Sales,Jamille Alencar, AU - Aguiar,Lara de, AU - Paiva,Manoel de Araújo Neto, AU - Cordeiro,Rossana de Aguiar, AU - Pereira-Neto,Waldemiro de Aquino, AU - Pinheiro,Adriana de Queiroz, AU - Sidrim,José Júlio Costa, AU - Castelo-Branco,Débora de Souza Collares Maia, AU - Rocha,Marcos Fábio Gadelha, Y1 - 2018/05/04/ PY - 2017/11/06/received PY - 2018/04/23/revised PY - 2018/05/03/accepted PY - 2018/6/11/entrez PY - 2018/6/11/pubmed PY - 2018/11/21/medline KW - Antifungal susceptibility KW - Malassezia pachydermatis KW - Pathogenicity KW - Virulence attributes SP - 47 EP - 52 JF - Veterinary microbiology JO - Vet. Microbiol. VL - 220 N2 - The yeast Malassezia pachydermatis is a component of the microbiota of dogs and cats, however it can cause otitis and seborrheic dermatitis in these animals. The objective of this study was to determine the antifungal susceptibility, and evaluate virulence and pathogenicity of 25 M. pachydermatis strains from animals. Susceptibility to ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, terbinafine, and amphotericin B was evaluated by broth microdilution assay. In addition, biofilm-forming ability, protease, phospholipase, hemolysin and melanin production and adhesion to epithelial cells by this yeast species were assessed. Finally, strain pathogenicity was investigated using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Concerning the planktonic susceptibility, minimum inhibitory concentrations varied from <0.03 to>64 μg/mL for azole derivatives, 1 to >16 μg/mL for amphotericin B and 0.03 to 0.25 μg/mL for terbinafine. All strains were classified as strong biofilm producers, and ketoconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B presented the best inhibitory effect against mature biofilms. All fungal isolates produced proteases, whereas 14/25 strains were positive for phospholipase production. Hemolytic activity was not observed and 18/25 strains showed dark pigmentation in the presence of L-DOPA. Regarding adhesion to epithelial cells, a low adhesion rate was observed in 10/12 evaluated strains. C. elegans mortality rate reached 95.9% after 96 h of exposure of the worms to M. pachydermatis. This yeast species produces important virulence factors and presents high pathogenicity, corroborating its clinical importance. SN - 1873-2542 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29885800/Malassezia_pachydermatis_from_animals:_Planktonic_and_biofilm_antifungal_susceptibility_and_its_virulence_arsenal_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-1135(17)31292-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -