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Direct and possible indirect effects of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalisations among children in Malawi four years after programmatic introduction.
Vaccine. 2018 11 12; 36(47):7142-7148.V

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Despite increased use of vaccine in routine immunisation, rotavirus remains a major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in low-income countries. We describe rotavirus prevalence and hospitalisation in Malawi pre and four years post vaccine introduction; provide updated vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates; and assess rotavirus vaccine indirect effects.

METHODS

Children under five years of age presenting to a referral hospital in Blantyre with AGE were recruited. Stool samples were tested for rotavirus using Enzyme Immunoassay. The change in rotavirus prevalence was evaluated using Poisson regression. Time series analysis was used to further investigate trends in prevalence over time. VE against rotavirus diarrhoea of any severity was estimated using logistic regression. Indirect effects were estimated by evaluating rotavirus prevalence in unvaccinated children over time, and by comparing observed reductions in incidence of rotavirus hospitalisation to those expected based on vaccine coverage and trial efficacy estimates.

RESULTS

2320 children were included. Prevalence of rotavirus in hospitalised infants (<12 months) with AGE decreased from 69/139(49.64%) prior to vaccine introduction to 197/607(32.45%) post-vaccine introduction (adjusted RR 0.67[95% CI 0.55, 0.82]). Prevalence in children aged 12-23 months demonstrated a less substantial decline: 15/37(40.54%) pre- and 122/352(34.66%) post-vaccine introduction (adjusted RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.57, 1.28). Adjusted VE was 61.89%(95% CI 28.04-79.82), but lower in children aged 12-23 months (31.69% [95% CI -139.03 to 80.48]). In hospitalised infants with rotavirus disease, the observed overall effect of the vaccine was 9% greater than expected according to vaccine coverage and efficacy estimates. Rotavirus prevalence among unvaccinated infants declined post-vaccine introduction (RR 0.70[95% CI 0.55-0.80]).

CONCLUSIONS

Following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi, prevalence of rotavirus in hospitalised children with AGE has declined significantly, with some evidence of an indirect effect in infants. Despite this, rotavirus remains an important cause of severe diarrhoea in Malawian children, particularly in the second year of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: aisleen.bennett@liv.ac.uk.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, UK.Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Gastrointestinal Infections, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Institute of Infection & Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29887320

Citation

Bennett, A, et al. "Direct and Possible Indirect Effects of Vaccination On Rotavirus Hospitalisations Among Children in Malawi Four Years After Programmatic Introduction." Vaccine, vol. 36, no. 47, 2018, pp. 7142-7148.
Bennett A, Pollock L, Jere KC, et al. Direct and possible indirect effects of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalisations among children in Malawi four years after programmatic introduction. Vaccine. 2018;36(47):7142-7148.
Bennett, A., Pollock, L., Jere, K. C., Pitzer, V. E., Parashar, U., Tate, J. E., Heyderman, R. S., Mwansambo, C., French, N., Nakagomi, O., Iturriza-Gomara, M., Everett, D., Cunliffe, N. A., & Bar-Zeev, N. (2018). Direct and possible indirect effects of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalisations among children in Malawi four years after programmatic introduction. Vaccine, 36(47), 7142-7148. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.04.030
Bennett A, et al. Direct and Possible Indirect Effects of Vaccination On Rotavirus Hospitalisations Among Children in Malawi Four Years After Programmatic Introduction. Vaccine. 2018 11 12;36(47):7142-7148. PubMed PMID: 29887320.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Direct and possible indirect effects of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalisations among children in Malawi four years after programmatic introduction. AU - Bennett,A, AU - Pollock,L, AU - Jere,K C, AU - Pitzer,V E, AU - Parashar,U, AU - Tate,J E, AU - Heyderman,R S, AU - Mwansambo,C, AU - French,N, AU - Nakagomi,O, AU - Iturriza-Gomara,M, AU - Everett,D, AU - Cunliffe,N A, AU - Bar-Zeev,N, AU - ,, Y1 - 2018/06/07/ PY - 2017/06/12/received PY - 2017/11/24/revised PY - 2018/04/12/accepted PY - 2018/6/12/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2018/6/12/entrez KW - Indirect effects KW - Rotavirus KW - Vaccines SP - 7142 EP - 7148 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 36 IS - 47 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Despite increased use of vaccine in routine immunisation, rotavirus remains a major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in low-income countries. We describe rotavirus prevalence and hospitalisation in Malawi pre and four years post vaccine introduction; provide updated vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates; and assess rotavirus vaccine indirect effects. METHODS: Children under five years of age presenting to a referral hospital in Blantyre with AGE were recruited. Stool samples were tested for rotavirus using Enzyme Immunoassay. The change in rotavirus prevalence was evaluated using Poisson regression. Time series analysis was used to further investigate trends in prevalence over time. VE against rotavirus diarrhoea of any severity was estimated using logistic regression. Indirect effects were estimated by evaluating rotavirus prevalence in unvaccinated children over time, and by comparing observed reductions in incidence of rotavirus hospitalisation to those expected based on vaccine coverage and trial efficacy estimates. RESULTS: 2320 children were included. Prevalence of rotavirus in hospitalised infants (<12 months) with AGE decreased from 69/139(49.64%) prior to vaccine introduction to 197/607(32.45%) post-vaccine introduction (adjusted RR 0.67[95% CI 0.55, 0.82]). Prevalence in children aged 12-23 months demonstrated a less substantial decline: 15/37(40.54%) pre- and 122/352(34.66%) post-vaccine introduction (adjusted RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.57, 1.28). Adjusted VE was 61.89%(95% CI 28.04-79.82), but lower in children aged 12-23 months (31.69% [95% CI -139.03 to 80.48]). In hospitalised infants with rotavirus disease, the observed overall effect of the vaccine was 9% greater than expected according to vaccine coverage and efficacy estimates. Rotavirus prevalence among unvaccinated infants declined post-vaccine introduction (RR 0.70[95% CI 0.55-0.80]). CONCLUSIONS: Following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi, prevalence of rotavirus in hospitalised children with AGE has declined significantly, with some evidence of an indirect effect in infants. Despite this, rotavirus remains an important cause of severe diarrhoea in Malawian children, particularly in the second year of life. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29887320/Direct_and_possible_indirect_effects_of_vaccination_on_rotavirus_hospitalisations_among_children_in_Malawi_four_years_after_programmatic_introduction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(18)30513-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -