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Surgical smoke: Risk assessment and mitigation strategies.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2018; 79(4):746-755JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although many dermatologic surgeons are aware of the risks of surgical smoke, many do not use hazard reduction strategies.

OBJECTIVE

To identify the infectious, inhalational, chemical, and mutagenic risks of surgical smoke in dermatologic procedures and suggest evidence-based hazard reduction strategies.

METHODS

A review of articles indexed for MEDLINE on PubMed using the keywords surgical smoke, dermatology, surgical mask, respirator, smoke evacuator, and guidelines in 13 combinations was performed by using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocols. The review included data from 45 articles from the dermatology, surgery, infectious disease, obstetrics, and cancer biology literature.

RESULTS

There are risks associated with surgical smoke, and although some dermatologists are aware of these risks, many are not using hazard reduction strategies such as smoke evacuators and surgical masks.

LIMITATIONS

Most of the data regarding the hazards of surgical smoke and methods for smoke safety are derived from in vitro and in vivo studies in nonhumans, as well as from resources outside of the dermatology literature.

CONCLUSION

Standardized guidelines for surgical smoke safety should be implemented in the dermatology community and residency curriculum.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York.Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: shl9032@med.cornell.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29902546

Citation

Georgesen, Corey, and Shari R. Lipner. "Surgical Smoke: Risk Assessment and Mitigation Strategies." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 79, no. 4, 2018, pp. 746-755.
Georgesen C, Lipner SR. Surgical smoke: Risk assessment and mitigation strategies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;79(4):746-755.
Georgesen, C., & Lipner, S. R. (2018). Surgical smoke: Risk assessment and mitigation strategies. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 79(4), pp. 746-755. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2018.06.003.
Georgesen C, Lipner SR. Surgical Smoke: Risk Assessment and Mitigation Strategies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018;79(4):746-755. PubMed PMID: 29902546.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Surgical smoke: Risk assessment and mitigation strategies. AU - Georgesen,Corey, AU - Lipner,Shari R, Y1 - 2018/06/11/ PY - 2017/11/21/received PY - 2018/05/28/revised PY - 2018/06/03/accepted PY - 2018/6/15/pubmed PY - 2019/1/18/medline PY - 2018/6/15/entrez KW - N95 mask KW - electrosurgery KW - lasers KW - residency training KW - safety KW - smoke evacuator KW - surgical mask KW - surgical plume KW - surgical smoke KW - verruca SP - 746 EP - 755 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. VL - 79 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although many dermatologic surgeons are aware of the risks of surgical smoke, many do not use hazard reduction strategies. OBJECTIVE: To identify the infectious, inhalational, chemical, and mutagenic risks of surgical smoke in dermatologic procedures and suggest evidence-based hazard reduction strategies. METHODS: A review of articles indexed for MEDLINE on PubMed using the keywords surgical smoke, dermatology, surgical mask, respirator, smoke evacuator, and guidelines in 13 combinations was performed by using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocols. The review included data from 45 articles from the dermatology, surgery, infectious disease, obstetrics, and cancer biology literature. RESULTS: There are risks associated with surgical smoke, and although some dermatologists are aware of these risks, many are not using hazard reduction strategies such as smoke evacuators and surgical masks. LIMITATIONS: Most of the data regarding the hazards of surgical smoke and methods for smoke safety are derived from in vitro and in vivo studies in nonhumans, as well as from resources outside of the dermatology literature. CONCLUSION: Standardized guidelines for surgical smoke safety should be implemented in the dermatology community and residency curriculum. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29902546/Surgical_smoke:_Risk_assessment_and_mitigation_strategies L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190-9622(18)32061-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -