Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Traditional and ethnobotanical dermatology practices in Romania and other Eastern European countries.
Clin Dermatol 2018 May - Jun; 36(3):338-352CD

Abstract

The geographic and ecologic specificity of Romania and other Eastern European countries has resulted in the development of an exceptional diversity of medicinal plants. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the ethnobotanical dermatology practices based on the use of medicinal plants in this region. The indications, ethnopharmacologic activities, parts used, and administration of 106 medicinal plants are provided. We also discuss the relative importance of these species, using two modified indices of quantitative ethnobotany: Use Value Index and Relative Dermatologic Importance, which were calculated on the basis of etic constructions (indications and ethnopharmacologic activities). The species identified to have the highest dermatologic importance (on a scale of 100) were Brassica oleracea L. (100), Matricaria chamomilla L. (79.17), Arctium lappa L. (74.82), Daucus carota L. (72.28), Equisetum arvense L. (70.47), Juglans regia L. (69.93), Populous nigra L. (65.94), Symphytum officinale L. (63.59), Chelidonium majus L. (57.78), Calendula officinalis L. (57.78), Achillea millefolium L. (57.43), Melilotus officinalis L. (55.25), Allium cepa L. (51.45), Quercus robur L. (51.08), and Betula spp. (50.91). This preliminary study on ethnobotanical dermatology practices indicates that Eastern European traditional medical knowledge represents an important heritage that is currently underexploited.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biochemistry Department, Faculty of General Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Electronic address: galati1968@yahoo.com.Dermatology Department, 2nd Clinic of Dermatology, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.Dermatology Department, Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Colentina Clinical Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29908576

Citation

Gilca, Marilena, et al. "Traditional and Ethnobotanical Dermatology Practices in Romania and Other Eastern European Countries." Clinics in Dermatology, vol. 36, no. 3, 2018, pp. 338-352.
Gilca M, Tiplica GS, Salavastru CM. Traditional and ethnobotanical dermatology practices in Romania and other Eastern European countries. Clin Dermatol. 2018;36(3):338-352.
Gilca, M., Tiplica, G. S., & Salavastru, C. M. (2018). Traditional and ethnobotanical dermatology practices in Romania and other Eastern European countries. Clinics in Dermatology, 36(3), pp. 338-352. doi:10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.03.008.
Gilca M, Tiplica GS, Salavastru CM. Traditional and Ethnobotanical Dermatology Practices in Romania and Other Eastern European Countries. Clin Dermatol. 2018;36(3):338-352. PubMed PMID: 29908576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traditional and ethnobotanical dermatology practices in Romania and other Eastern European countries. AU - Gilca,Marilena, AU - Tiplica,George Sorin, AU - Salavastru,Carmen Maria, Y1 - 2018/03/10/ PY - 2018/6/18/entrez PY - 2018/6/18/pubmed PY - 2018/11/7/medline SP - 338 EP - 352 JF - Clinics in dermatology JO - Clin. Dermatol. VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - The geographic and ecologic specificity of Romania and other Eastern European countries has resulted in the development of an exceptional diversity of medicinal plants. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the ethnobotanical dermatology practices based on the use of medicinal plants in this region. The indications, ethnopharmacologic activities, parts used, and administration of 106 medicinal plants are provided. We also discuss the relative importance of these species, using two modified indices of quantitative ethnobotany: Use Value Index and Relative Dermatologic Importance, which were calculated on the basis of etic constructions (indications and ethnopharmacologic activities). The species identified to have the highest dermatologic importance (on a scale of 100) were Brassica oleracea L. (100), Matricaria chamomilla L. (79.17), Arctium lappa L. (74.82), Daucus carota L. (72.28), Equisetum arvense L. (70.47), Juglans regia L. (69.93), Populous nigra L. (65.94), Symphytum officinale L. (63.59), Chelidonium majus L. (57.78), Calendula officinalis L. (57.78), Achillea millefolium L. (57.43), Melilotus officinalis L. (55.25), Allium cepa L. (51.45), Quercus robur L. (51.08), and Betula spp. (50.91). This preliminary study on ethnobotanical dermatology practices indicates that Eastern European traditional medical knowledge represents an important heritage that is currently underexploited. SN - 1879-1131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29908576/Traditional_and_ethnobotanical_dermatology_practices_in_Romania_and_other_Eastern_European_countries L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-081X(18)30044-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -