Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives.
Contact Dermatitis 2018; 79(3):149-156CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hand eczema (HE) in healthcare workers (HCWs) is common. Besides wet work, healthcare work also implies exposure to contact allergens.

OBJECTIVES

To assess HE and contact allergy related to occupational exposures in HCWs.

METHODS

In a cross-sectional study, 311 HCWs with HE within the preceding 12 months and a control group of 114 HCWs without HE were investigated with the baseline series and a special patch test series based on substances found in the gloves, soaps, alcoholic hand disinfectants and hand creams provided at the hospitals.

RESULTS

Contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly more common in HCWs with HE (6%) than in HCWs without HE (1%, P = .02). The corresponding percentages for fragrances were 11% and 3%, respectively (P = .004). Occupational HE was found in 193 of 311 (62%) HCWs. Of these, 22 of 193 (11%) had occupational allergic contact dermatitis, including 17 with glove-related rubber contact allergy. Contact allergy to diphenylguanidine was as common as contact allergy to thiurams. Occupational contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly associated with sick-leave related to HE.

CONCLUSION

Contact allergy to rubber additives in medical gloves is the most common cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in HCWs. Aimed patch testing with relevant rubber additives is mandatory when HE in HCWs is investigated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Clinical Studies Sweden, Forum South, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29923205

Citation

Hamnerius, Nils, et al. "Hand Eczema and Occupational Contact Allergies in Healthcare Workers With a Focus On Rubber Additives." Contact Dermatitis, vol. 79, no. 3, 2018, pp. 149-156.
Hamnerius N, Svedman C, Bergendorff O, et al. Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives. Contact Derm. 2018;79(3):149-156.
Hamnerius, N., Svedman, C., Bergendorff, O., Björk, J., Bruze, M., Engfeldt, M., & Pontén, A. (2018). Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives. Contact Dermatitis, 79(3), pp. 149-156. doi:10.1111/cod.13042.
Hamnerius N, et al. Hand Eczema and Occupational Contact Allergies in Healthcare Workers With a Focus On Rubber Additives. Contact Derm. 2018;79(3):149-156. PubMed PMID: 29923205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives. AU - Hamnerius,Nils, AU - Svedman,Cecilia, AU - Bergendorff,Ola, AU - Björk,Jonas, AU - Bruze,Magnus, AU - Engfeldt,Malin, AU - Pontén,Ann, Y1 - 2018/06/20/ PY - 2018/03/20/received PY - 2018/05/01/revised PY - 2018/05/03/accepted PY - 2018/6/21/pubmed PY - 2019/4/30/medline PY - 2018/6/21/entrez KW - contact allergy KW - diphenylguanidine KW - hand eczema KW - healthcare worker KW - patch test KW - rubber additive SP - 149 EP - 156 JF - Contact dermatitis JO - Contact Derm. VL - 79 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hand eczema (HE) in healthcare workers (HCWs) is common. Besides wet work, healthcare work also implies exposure to contact allergens. OBJECTIVES: To assess HE and contact allergy related to occupational exposures in HCWs. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 311 HCWs with HE within the preceding 12 months and a control group of 114 HCWs without HE were investigated with the baseline series and a special patch test series based on substances found in the gloves, soaps, alcoholic hand disinfectants and hand creams provided at the hospitals. RESULTS: Contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly more common in HCWs with HE (6%) than in HCWs without HE (1%, P = .02). The corresponding percentages for fragrances were 11% and 3%, respectively (P = .004). Occupational HE was found in 193 of 311 (62%) HCWs. Of these, 22 of 193 (11%) had occupational allergic contact dermatitis, including 17 with glove-related rubber contact allergy. Contact allergy to diphenylguanidine was as common as contact allergy to thiurams. Occupational contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly associated with sick-leave related to HE. CONCLUSION: Contact allergy to rubber additives in medical gloves is the most common cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in HCWs. Aimed patch testing with relevant rubber additives is mandatory when HE in HCWs is investigated. SN - 1600-0536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29923205/Hand_eczema_and_occupational_contact_allergies_in_healthcare_workers_with_a_focus_on_rubber_additives_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cod.13042 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -