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Investigation of ciguatoxins in invasive lionfish from the greater caribbean region: Implications for fishery development.
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198358.Plos

Abstract

Lionfish, native to reef ecosystems of the tropical and sub-tropical Indo-Pacific, were introduced to Florida waters in the 1980s, and have spread rapidly throughout the northwestern Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. These invasive, carnivorous fish significantly reduce other fish and benthic invertebrate biomass, fish recruitment, and species richness in reef ecosystems. Fisheries resource managers have proposed the establishment of a commercial fishery to reduce lionfish populations and mitigate adverse effects on reef communities. The potential for a commercial fishery for lionfish is the primary reason to identify locations where lionfish accumulate sufficient amounts of ciguatoxin (CTX) to cause ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), the leading cause of non-bacterial seafood poisoning associated with fish consumption. To address this issue, an initial geographic assessment of CTX toxicity in lionfish from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico was conducted. Lionfish samples (n = 293) were collected by spearfishing from 13 locations (74 sampling sites) around the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico between 2012 and 2015. The highest frequencies of lionfish containing measurable CTX occurred in areas known to be high-risk regions for CFP in the central to eastern Caribbean (e.g., 53% British Virgin Islands and 5% Florida Keys). Though measurable CTX was found in some locations, the majority of the samples (99.3%) contained CTX concentrations below the United States Food and Drug Administration guidance level of 0.1 ppb Caribbean ciguatoxin-1 (C-CTX-1) equivalents (eq.). Only 0.7% of lionfish tested contained more than 0.1 ppb C-CTX-1 eq. As of 2018, there has been one suspected case of CFP from eating lionfish. Given this finding, current risk reduction techniques used to manage CTX accumulating fish are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.Institut Louis Malardé (ILM)-UMR 241 EIO, Laboratory of Toxic-Microalgae, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia.Institut Louis Malardé (ILM)-UMR 241 EIO, Laboratory of Toxic-Microalgae, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia.Ocean Tester, LLC, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.North Carolina State University, Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Laboratory, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Division of Seafood Science and Technology, Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory, Dauphin Island, Alabama, United States of America.U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Division of Seafood Science and Technology, Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory, Dauphin Island, Alabama, United States of America.University of the West Indies, Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory and Field Station, Discovery Bay, St. Ann, Jamaica WI.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29924826

Citation

Hardison, D Ransom, et al. "Investigation of Ciguatoxins in Invasive Lionfish From the Greater Caribbean Region: Implications for Fishery Development." PloS One, vol. 13, no. 6, 2018, pp. e0198358.
Hardison DR, Holland WC, Darius HT, et al. Investigation of ciguatoxins in invasive lionfish from the greater caribbean region: Implications for fishery development. PLoS One. 2018;13(6):e0198358.
Hardison, D. R., Holland, W. C., Darius, H. T., Chinain, M., Tester, P. A., Shea, D., Bogdanoff, A. K., Morris, J. A., Flores Quintana, H. A., Loeffler, C. R., Buddo, D., & Litaker, R. W. (2018). Investigation of ciguatoxins in invasive lionfish from the greater caribbean region: Implications for fishery development. PloS One, 13(6), e0198358. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198358
Hardison DR, et al. Investigation of Ciguatoxins in Invasive Lionfish From the Greater Caribbean Region: Implications for Fishery Development. PLoS One. 2018;13(6):e0198358. PubMed PMID: 29924826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Investigation of ciguatoxins in invasive lionfish from the greater caribbean region: Implications for fishery development. AU - Hardison,D Ransom, AU - Holland,William C, AU - Darius,H Taiana, AU - Chinain,Mireille, AU - Tester,Patricia A, AU - Shea,Damian, AU - Bogdanoff,Alex K, AU - Morris,James A,Jr AU - Flores Quintana,Harold A, AU - Loeffler,Christopher R, AU - Buddo,Dayne, AU - Litaker,R Wayne, Y1 - 2018/06/20/ PY - 2017/11/21/received PY - 2018/05/17/accepted PY - 2018/6/21/entrez PY - 2018/6/21/pubmed PY - 2018/12/12/medline SP - e0198358 EP - e0198358 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - Lionfish, native to reef ecosystems of the tropical and sub-tropical Indo-Pacific, were introduced to Florida waters in the 1980s, and have spread rapidly throughout the northwestern Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. These invasive, carnivorous fish significantly reduce other fish and benthic invertebrate biomass, fish recruitment, and species richness in reef ecosystems. Fisheries resource managers have proposed the establishment of a commercial fishery to reduce lionfish populations and mitigate adverse effects on reef communities. The potential for a commercial fishery for lionfish is the primary reason to identify locations where lionfish accumulate sufficient amounts of ciguatoxin (CTX) to cause ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), the leading cause of non-bacterial seafood poisoning associated with fish consumption. To address this issue, an initial geographic assessment of CTX toxicity in lionfish from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico was conducted. Lionfish samples (n = 293) were collected by spearfishing from 13 locations (74 sampling sites) around the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico between 2012 and 2015. The highest frequencies of lionfish containing measurable CTX occurred in areas known to be high-risk regions for CFP in the central to eastern Caribbean (e.g., 53% British Virgin Islands and 5% Florida Keys). Though measurable CTX was found in some locations, the majority of the samples (99.3%) contained CTX concentrations below the United States Food and Drug Administration guidance level of 0.1 ppb Caribbean ciguatoxin-1 (C-CTX-1) equivalents (eq.). Only 0.7% of lionfish tested contained more than 0.1 ppb C-CTX-1 eq. As of 2018, there has been one suspected case of CFP from eating lionfish. Given this finding, current risk reduction techniques used to manage CTX accumulating fish are discussed. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29924826/Investigation_of_ciguatoxins_in_invasive_lionfish_from_the_greater_caribbean_region:_Implications_for_fishery_development_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198358 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -