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Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease.
Front Neurol 2018; 9:419FN

Abstract

Background:

Functional imaging methods, such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, reflect changes in neural connectivity and may help to assess the widespread consequences of disease-specific network changes in Parkinson's disease. In this study we used a relatively new graph analysis approach in functional imaging: eigenvector centrality mapping. This model-free method, applied to all voxels in the brain, identifies prominent regions in the brain network hierarchy and detects localized differences between patient populations. In other neurological disorders, eigenvector centrality mapping has been linked to changes in functional connectivity in certain nodes of brain networks.

Objectives:

Examining changes in functional brain connectivity architecture on a whole brain and network level in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Methods:

Whole brain resting-state functional architecture was studied with a recently introduced graph analysis approach (eigenvector centrality mapping). Functional connectivity was further investigated in relation to eight known resting-state networks. Cross-sectional analyses included group comparison of functional connectivity measures of Parkinson's disease patients (n = 107) with control subjects (n = 58) and correlations with clinical data, including motor and cognitive impairment and a composite measure of predominantly non-dopaminergic symptoms.

Results:

Eigenvector centrality mapping revealed that frontoparietal regions were more prominent in the whole-brain network function in patients compared to control subjects, while frontal and occipital brain areas were less prominent in patients. Using standard resting-state networks, we found predominantly increased functional connectivity, namely within sensorimotor system and visual networks in patients. Regional group differences in functional connectivity of both techniques between patients and control subjects partly overlapped for highly connected posterior brain regions, in particular in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Clinico-functional imaging relations were not found.

Conclusions:

Changes on the level of functional brain connectivity architecture might provide a different perspective of pathological consequences of Parkinson's disease. The involvement of specific, highly connected (hub) brain regions may influence whole brain functional network architecture in Parkinson's disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. Department of Methodology and Statistics, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands. Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. Department of Neurology, Antonius Hospital, Woerden, Netherlands.Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29928255

Citation

de Schipper, Laura J., et al. "Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease." Frontiers in Neurology, vol. 9, 2018, p. 419.
de Schipper LJ, Hafkemeijer A, van der Grond J, et al. Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease. Front Neurol. 2018;9:419.
de Schipper, L. J., Hafkemeijer, A., van der Grond, J., Marinus, J., Henselmans, J. M. L., & van Hilten, J. J. (2018). Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Neurology, 9, p. 419. doi:10.3389/fneur.2018.00419.
de Schipper LJ, et al. Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease. Front Neurol. 2018;9:419. PubMed PMID: 29928255.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Altered Whole-Brain and Network-Based Functional Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease. AU - de Schipper,Laura J, AU - Hafkemeijer,Anne, AU - van der Grond,Jeroen, AU - Marinus,Johan, AU - Henselmans,Johanna M L, AU - van Hilten,Jacobus J, Y1 - 2018/06/06/ PY - 2018/02/14/received PY - 2018/05/22/accepted PY - 2018/6/22/entrez PY - 2018/6/22/pubmed PY - 2018/6/22/medline KW - Parkinson's disease KW - connectome KW - eigenvector centrality mapping KW - functional magnetic resonance imaging KW - network KW - resting-state SP - 419 EP - 419 JF - Frontiers in neurology JO - Front Neurol VL - 9 N2 - Background: Functional imaging methods, such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, reflect changes in neural connectivity and may help to assess the widespread consequences of disease-specific network changes in Parkinson's disease. In this study we used a relatively new graph analysis approach in functional imaging: eigenvector centrality mapping. This model-free method, applied to all voxels in the brain, identifies prominent regions in the brain network hierarchy and detects localized differences between patient populations. In other neurological disorders, eigenvector centrality mapping has been linked to changes in functional connectivity in certain nodes of brain networks. Objectives: Examining changes in functional brain connectivity architecture on a whole brain and network level in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods: Whole brain resting-state functional architecture was studied with a recently introduced graph analysis approach (eigenvector centrality mapping). Functional connectivity was further investigated in relation to eight known resting-state networks. Cross-sectional analyses included group comparison of functional connectivity measures of Parkinson's disease patients (n = 107) with control subjects (n = 58) and correlations with clinical data, including motor and cognitive impairment and a composite measure of predominantly non-dopaminergic symptoms. Results: Eigenvector centrality mapping revealed that frontoparietal regions were more prominent in the whole-brain network function in patients compared to control subjects, while frontal and occipital brain areas were less prominent in patients. Using standard resting-state networks, we found predominantly increased functional connectivity, namely within sensorimotor system and visual networks in patients. Regional group differences in functional connectivity of both techniques between patients and control subjects partly overlapped for highly connected posterior brain regions, in particular in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Clinico-functional imaging relations were not found. Conclusions: Changes on the level of functional brain connectivity architecture might provide a different perspective of pathological consequences of Parkinson's disease. The involvement of specific, highly connected (hub) brain regions may influence whole brain functional network architecture in Parkinson's disease. SN - 1664-2295 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29928255/Altered_Whole_Brain_and_Network_Based_Functional_Connectivity_in_Parkinson's_Disease_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2018.00419 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -