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A high-risk Zika and dengue transmission hub: virus detections in mosquitoes at a Brazilian university campus.
Parasit Vectors 2018; 11(1):359PV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Zika virus (ZIKV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses prevalent throughout tropical regions. Currently, management of ZIKV and DENV centers on control of the primary vector Aedes aegypti. This vector is highly anthropophilic and is therefore prevalent throughout densely urbanised landscapes. A new passive trap for gravid Ae. aegypti (Gravid Aedes Trap - GAT) was developed for mosquito surveillance. Here the different killing agents and the level of transmission of arboviruses that may occur in mosquitoes sampled by GATs are assessed for the first time.

METHODS

Gravid Aedes traps (GATs) were deployed at the Federal University of Minas Gerais campus, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil to sample Ae. aegypti. Three different killing agents were evaluated within the GATs: sticky cards, long-lasting insecticide-impregnated nets (LLINs) and canola oil. Traps were monitored weekly for 14 weeks then mosquito specimens were identified to the species level and Ae. aegypti catches were pooled and submitted to qRT-PCR assays for to DENV and ZIKV virus detection, followed by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV. Additionally, comparisons of means were performed on transformed weekly catch data (P = 0.05, t-tests) with the stats package of the R statistical software.

RESULTS

In total, 1506 female Ae. aegypti were captured using GATs, with traps using sticky cards catching more mosquito than those using either LLINs or canola oil. Both ZIKV and DENV were detected in Ae. aegypti females captured over several weeks suggesting that this highly populated university campus may have served as a significant transmission hub. The infection rate for ZIKV was present in seven (8.5%) pools from four weeks while DENV was detected in four (4.9%) pools from four weeks. Phylogenetic analysis of ZIKV classified the strain as Asian genotype.

CONCLUSIONS

The Federal University of Minas Gerais and similar organizations must strongly consider monitoring Ae. aegypti populations and reinforcing personal protection of staff and students during seasons of high mosquito activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. alvaro@icb.ufmg.br.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia. Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.Department of Microbiology, Laboratório de Vírus, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia. Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29929561

Citation

Eiras, Alvaro E., et al. "A High-risk Zika and Dengue Transmission Hub: Virus Detections in Mosquitoes at a Brazilian University Campus." Parasites & Vectors, vol. 11, no. 1, 2018, p. 359.
Eiras AE, Pires SF, Staunton KM, et al. A high-risk Zika and dengue transmission hub: virus detections in mosquitoes at a Brazilian university campus. Parasit Vectors. 2018;11(1):359.
Eiras, A. E., Pires, S. F., Staunton, K. M., Paixão, K. S., Resende, M. C., Silva, H. A., ... Ritchie, S. A. (2018). A high-risk Zika and dengue transmission hub: virus detections in mosquitoes at a Brazilian university campus. Parasites & Vectors, 11(1), p. 359. doi:10.1186/s13071-018-2883-8.
Eiras AE, et al. A High-risk Zika and Dengue Transmission Hub: Virus Detections in Mosquitoes at a Brazilian University Campus. Parasit Vectors. 2018 Jun 22;11(1):359. PubMed PMID: 29929561.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A high-risk Zika and dengue transmission hub: virus detections in mosquitoes at a Brazilian university campus. AU - Eiras,Alvaro E, AU - Pires,Simone F, AU - Staunton,Kyran M, AU - Paixão,Kelly S, AU - Resende,Marcelo C, AU - Silva,Hilcielly A, AU - Rocha,Isadora G, AU - Oliveira,Bruna A, AU - Peres,Anderson M, AU - Drumond,Betânia P, AU - Ritchie,Scott A, Y1 - 2018/06/22/ PY - 2017/09/27/received PY - 2018/05/01/accepted PY - 2018/6/23/entrez PY - 2018/6/23/pubmed PY - 2018/12/12/medline KW - Aedes aegypti KW - Dengue virus KW - Dissemination premises KW - GAT KW - Zika virus SP - 359 EP - 359 JF - Parasites & vectors JO - Parasit Vectors VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Zika virus (ZIKV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses prevalent throughout tropical regions. Currently, management of ZIKV and DENV centers on control of the primary vector Aedes aegypti. This vector is highly anthropophilic and is therefore prevalent throughout densely urbanised landscapes. A new passive trap for gravid Ae. aegypti (Gravid Aedes Trap - GAT) was developed for mosquito surveillance. Here the different killing agents and the level of transmission of arboviruses that may occur in mosquitoes sampled by GATs are assessed for the first time. METHODS: Gravid Aedes traps (GATs) were deployed at the Federal University of Minas Gerais campus, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil to sample Ae. aegypti. Three different killing agents were evaluated within the GATs: sticky cards, long-lasting insecticide-impregnated nets (LLINs) and canola oil. Traps were monitored weekly for 14 weeks then mosquito specimens were identified to the species level and Ae. aegypti catches were pooled and submitted to qRT-PCR assays for to DENV and ZIKV virus detection, followed by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV. Additionally, comparisons of means were performed on transformed weekly catch data (P = 0.05, t-tests) with the stats package of the R statistical software. RESULTS: In total, 1506 female Ae. aegypti were captured using GATs, with traps using sticky cards catching more mosquito than those using either LLINs or canola oil. Both ZIKV and DENV were detected in Ae. aegypti females captured over several weeks suggesting that this highly populated university campus may have served as a significant transmission hub. The infection rate for ZIKV was present in seven (8.5%) pools from four weeks while DENV was detected in four (4.9%) pools from four weeks. Phylogenetic analysis of ZIKV classified the strain as Asian genotype. CONCLUSIONS: The Federal University of Minas Gerais and similar organizations must strongly consider monitoring Ae. aegypti populations and reinforcing personal protection of staff and students during seasons of high mosquito activity. SN - 1756-3305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29929561/A_high_risk_Zika_and_dengue_transmission_hub:_virus_detections_in_mosquitoes_at_a_Brazilian_university_campus_ L2 - https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-018-2883-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -