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Identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions of captive sea turtles Chelonia mydas.
Vet Res Commun. 2018 Sep; 42(3):251-254.VR

Abstract

Anthropogenic activities, predation, and diseases have contributed to a decrease in the sea turtle population in recent years. Ulcerative stomatitis is a condition that occurs in both wild and captive populations. The etiology of this condition is associated with bacteria such as E. coli, Citrobacter diversus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas spp., Flavobacter calcoaceticus, Staphylococcus spp., and Flavobacterium spp. Some of these microorganisms are part of the oral microbiota of turtles, but alterations in the immune response can disturb the homeostatic relationship and cause an increase in the population of microorganisms, which in turn can cause disease. This work presents results on the isolation and identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions in captive C. mydas turtles. Oral mucosa samples from 20 clinically healthy turtles and ten animals with ulcerative stomatitis lesions were studied. The samples were cultivated in enriched and differential media, and the identification was made using an automated method. The results showed a great diversity of bacteria in animals with ulcerative stomatitis with a higher prevalence of S. lentus and C. braakii was higher (60 and 50%, respectively) than in healthy animals. E. faecium was identified in 40% of diseased animals and 55% healthy animals. Turtles in this study had a diverse oral microbiota, and S. lentus and C. braakii may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of ulcerative stomatitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Facultad de Agronomía y Veterinaria, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Carretera San Luis Potosí - Matehuala km. 14.5, S.L.P. C.P. 78321, Soledad de Graciano Sánchez, Mexico.Facultad de Agronomía y Veterinaria, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Carretera San Luis Potosí - Matehuala km. 14.5, S.L.P. C.P. 78321, Soledad de Graciano Sánchez, Mexico.Departamento de Salud Pública/División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Unidad de Investigación Básica y Clínica en Enfermedades Infecciosas, Mexico City, Mexico. Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez Facultad de Medicina-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico.Departamento de Salud Pública/División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Unidad de Investigación Básica y Clínica en Enfermedades Infecciosas, Mexico City, Mexico. Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez Facultad de Medicina-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico.Parque Xcaret, Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, Mexico.Parque Xcaret, Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, Mexico.Facultad de Agronomía y Veterinaria, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Carretera San Luis Potosí - Matehuala km. 14.5, S.L.P. C.P. 78321, Soledad de Graciano Sánchez, Mexico. fernando.munoz@uaslp.mx.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29934703

Citation

Vega-Manriquez, D X., et al. "Identification of Bacteria Present in Ulcerative Stomatitis Lesions of Captive Sea Turtles Chelonia Mydas." Veterinary Research Communications, vol. 42, no. 3, 2018, pp. 251-254.
Vega-Manriquez DX, Dávila-Arrellano RP, Eslava-Campos CA, et al. Identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions of captive sea turtles Chelonia mydas. Vet Res Commun. 2018;42(3):251-254.
Vega-Manriquez, D. X., Dávila-Arrellano, R. P., Eslava-Campos, C. A., Salazar Jiménez, E., Negrete-Philippe, A. C., Raigoza-Figueras, R., & Muñoz-Tenería, F. A. (2018). Identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions of captive sea turtles Chelonia mydas. Veterinary Research Communications, 42(3), 251-254. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11259-018-9728-y
Vega-Manriquez DX, et al. Identification of Bacteria Present in Ulcerative Stomatitis Lesions of Captive Sea Turtles Chelonia Mydas. Vet Res Commun. 2018;42(3):251-254. PubMed PMID: 29934703.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions of captive sea turtles Chelonia mydas. AU - Vega-Manriquez,D X, AU - Dávila-Arrellano,R P, AU - Eslava-Campos,C A, AU - Salazar Jiménez,E, AU - Negrete-Philippe,A C, AU - Raigoza-Figueras,R, AU - Muñoz-Tenería,F A, Y1 - 2018/06/22/ PY - 2018/03/13/received PY - 2018/06/19/accepted PY - 2018/6/24/pubmed PY - 2019/2/23/medline PY - 2018/6/24/entrez KW - C. mydas KW - Infection bacterial KW - Turtles KW - Ulcerative stomatitis SP - 251 EP - 254 JF - Veterinary research communications JO - Vet. Res. Commun. VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - Anthropogenic activities, predation, and diseases have contributed to a decrease in the sea turtle population in recent years. Ulcerative stomatitis is a condition that occurs in both wild and captive populations. The etiology of this condition is associated with bacteria such as E. coli, Citrobacter diversus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas spp., Flavobacter calcoaceticus, Staphylococcus spp., and Flavobacterium spp. Some of these microorganisms are part of the oral microbiota of turtles, but alterations in the immune response can disturb the homeostatic relationship and cause an increase in the population of microorganisms, which in turn can cause disease. This work presents results on the isolation and identification of bacteria present in ulcerative stomatitis lesions in captive C. mydas turtles. Oral mucosa samples from 20 clinically healthy turtles and ten animals with ulcerative stomatitis lesions were studied. The samples were cultivated in enriched and differential media, and the identification was made using an automated method. The results showed a great diversity of bacteria in animals with ulcerative stomatitis with a higher prevalence of S. lentus and C. braakii was higher (60 and 50%, respectively) than in healthy animals. E. faecium was identified in 40% of diseased animals and 55% healthy animals. Turtles in this study had a diverse oral microbiota, and S. lentus and C. braakii may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of ulcerative stomatitis. SN - 1573-7446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29934703/Identification_of_bacteria_present_in_ulcerative_stomatitis_lesions_of_captive_sea_turtles_Chelonia_mydas L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11259-018-9728-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -