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Modulation of acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on psychotomimetic effects, cognition and brain function by previous cannabis exposure.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2018; 28(7):850-862EN

Abstract

Cannabis use has been associated with psychosis and cognitive dysfunction. Some evidence suggests that the acute behavioral and neurocognitive effects of the main active ingredient in cannabis, (-)-trans-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), might be modulated by previous cannabis exposure. However, this has not been investigated either using a control group of non-users, or following abstinence in modest cannabis users, who represent the majority of recreational users. Twenty-four healthy men participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures, within-subject, ∆9-THC challenge study. Compared to non-users (N=12; <5 lifetime cannabis joints smoked), abstinent modest cannabis users (N=12; 24.5±9 lifetime cannabis joints smoked) showed worse performance and stronger right hemispheric activation during cognitive processing, independent of the acute challenge (all P≤0.047). Acute ∆9-THC administration produced transient anxiety and psychotomimetic symptoms (all P≤0.02), the latter being greater in non-users compared to users (P=0.040). Non-users under placebo (control group) activated specific brain areas to perform the tasks, while deactivating others. An opposite pattern was found under acute (∆9-THC challenge in non-users) as well as residual (cannabis users under placebo) effect of ∆9-THC. Under ∆9-THC, cannabis users showed brain activity patterns intermediate between those in non-users under placebo (control group), and non-users under ∆9-THC (acute effect) and cannabis users under placebo (residual effect). In non-users, the more severe the ∆9-THC-induced psychotomimetic symptoms and cognitive impairments, the more pronounced was the neurophysiological alteration (all P≤0.036). Previous modest cannabis use blunts the acute behavioral and neurophysiological effects of ∆9-THC, which are more marked in people who have never used cannabis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King׳s College London, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sagnik.2.bhattacharyya@kcl.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29935939

Citation

Colizzi, Marco, et al. "Modulation of Acute Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Psychotomimetic Effects, Cognition and Brain Function By Previous Cannabis Exposure." European Neuropsychopharmacology : the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 28, no. 7, 2018, pp. 850-862.
Colizzi M, McGuire P, Giampietro V, et al. Modulation of acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on psychotomimetic effects, cognition and brain function by previous cannabis exposure. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2018;28(7):850-862.
Colizzi, M., McGuire, P., Giampietro, V., Williams, S., Brammer, M., & Bhattacharyya, S. (2018). Modulation of acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on psychotomimetic effects, cognition and brain function by previous cannabis exposure. European Neuropsychopharmacology : the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 28(7), pp. 850-862. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2018.04.003.
Colizzi M, et al. Modulation of Acute Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol On Psychotomimetic Effects, Cognition and Brain Function By Previous Cannabis Exposure. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2018;28(7):850-862. PubMed PMID: 29935939.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Modulation of acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on psychotomimetic effects, cognition and brain function by previous cannabis exposure. AU - Colizzi,Marco, AU - McGuire,Philip, AU - Giampietro,Vincent, AU - Williams,Steve, AU - Brammer,Mick, AU - Bhattacharyya,Sagnik, Y1 - 2018/06/21/ PY - 2017/09/29/received PY - 2018/04/24/revised PY - 2018/04/30/accepted PY - 2018/6/25/pubmed PY - 2019/4/25/medline PY - 2018/6/25/entrez KW - Cannabis use KW - Cognitive functioning KW - Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol KW - Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging KW - Psychosis KW - Tolerance SP - 850 EP - 862 JF - European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology JO - Eur Neuropsychopharmacol VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - Cannabis use has been associated with psychosis and cognitive dysfunction. Some evidence suggests that the acute behavioral and neurocognitive effects of the main active ingredient in cannabis, (-)-trans-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), might be modulated by previous cannabis exposure. However, this has not been investigated either using a control group of non-users, or following abstinence in modest cannabis users, who represent the majority of recreational users. Twenty-four healthy men participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures, within-subject, ∆9-THC challenge study. Compared to non-users (N=12; <5 lifetime cannabis joints smoked), abstinent modest cannabis users (N=12; 24.5±9 lifetime cannabis joints smoked) showed worse performance and stronger right hemispheric activation during cognitive processing, independent of the acute challenge (all P≤0.047). Acute ∆9-THC administration produced transient anxiety and psychotomimetic symptoms (all P≤0.02), the latter being greater in non-users compared to users (P=0.040). Non-users under placebo (control group) activated specific brain areas to perform the tasks, while deactivating others. An opposite pattern was found under acute (∆9-THC challenge in non-users) as well as residual (cannabis users under placebo) effect of ∆9-THC. Under ∆9-THC, cannabis users showed brain activity patterns intermediate between those in non-users under placebo (control group), and non-users under ∆9-THC (acute effect) and cannabis users under placebo (residual effect). In non-users, the more severe the ∆9-THC-induced psychotomimetic symptoms and cognitive impairments, the more pronounced was the neurophysiological alteration (all P≤0.036). Previous modest cannabis use blunts the acute behavioral and neurophysiological effects of ∆9-THC, which are more marked in people who have never used cannabis. SN - 1873-7862 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29935939/Modulation_of_acute_effects_of_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_on_psychotomimetic_effects_cognition_and_brain_function_by_previous_cannabis_exposure_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924-977X(18)30111-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -