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Population-representative analysis of dietary supplementation among Americans with diabetes mellitus.
J Diabetes 2019; 11(2):115-121JD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few population-representative studies have examined dietary supplement use among Americans with diabetes mellitus (DM). This investigation analyzed dietary supplementation and DM data from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

METHODS

Data from 5040 adult participants were analyzed, including 639 participants reporting a diagnosis of DM (Method 1), which increased to 1036 after including participants reporting "borderline" DM or prediabetes (Method 2). Participants reported dietary supplements used over the past month. The prevalence of supplementation was compared among participants with and without DM using the Rao-Scott likelihood Chi-squared test; multivariate logistic regression was used to examine whether DM was an independent predictor of supplementation.

RESULTS

Regardless of whether Method 1 or Method 2 was used, dietary supplementation was more prevalent among participants with DM (Method 1, 61.4% vs. 54.4%, P = 0.024; Method 2, 62.7% vs. 53.5%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for a variety of demographic and health-related variables, the presence of DM was no longer associated with supplementation for Method 1 (odds ratio [OR] 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-1.32; P = 0.925) or Method 2 (OR 1.13; 95% CI 0.91-1.41; P = 0.238). Approximately four of every five products taken for the purpose of managing DM were self-prescribed, the most common being multivitamins-minerals, cinnamon-containing supplements, and chromium-containing supplements.

CONCLUSIONS

Slightly more than six out of 10 Americans with DM use dietary supplements each month and, although this is higher than Americans without DM, it does not appear to be due to DM per se.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Movement Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29938914

Citation

Wilson, Patrick B.. "Population-representative Analysis of Dietary Supplementation Among Americans With Diabetes Mellitus." Journal of Diabetes, vol. 11, no. 2, 2019, pp. 115-121.
Wilson PB. Population-representative analysis of dietary supplementation among Americans with diabetes mellitus. J Diabetes. 2019;11(2):115-121.
Wilson, P. B. (2019). Population-representative analysis of dietary supplementation among Americans with diabetes mellitus. Journal of Diabetes, 11(2), pp. 115-121. doi:10.1111/1753-0407.12815.
Wilson PB. Population-representative Analysis of Dietary Supplementation Among Americans With Diabetes Mellitus. J Diabetes. 2019;11(2):115-121. PubMed PMID: 29938914.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Population-representative analysis of dietary supplementation among Americans with diabetes mellitus. A1 - Wilson,Patrick B, Y1 - 2018/07/24/ PY - 2018/04/26/received PY - 2018/06/14/revised PY - 2018/06/19/accepted PY - 2018/6/26/pubmed PY - 2019/3/19/medline PY - 2018/6/26/entrez KW - complementary medicine KW - diet KW - nutrition KW - supplement KW - survey KW - 营养 KW - 补充剂 KW - 补充疗法 KW - 调查 KW - 饮食 SP - 115 EP - 121 JF - Journal of diabetes JO - J Diabetes VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few population-representative studies have examined dietary supplement use among Americans with diabetes mellitus (DM). This investigation analyzed dietary supplementation and DM data from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). METHODS: Data from 5040 adult participants were analyzed, including 639 participants reporting a diagnosis of DM (Method 1), which increased to 1036 after including participants reporting "borderline" DM or prediabetes (Method 2). Participants reported dietary supplements used over the past month. The prevalence of supplementation was compared among participants with and without DM using the Rao-Scott likelihood Chi-squared test; multivariate logistic regression was used to examine whether DM was an independent predictor of supplementation. RESULTS: Regardless of whether Method 1 or Method 2 was used, dietary supplementation was more prevalent among participants with DM (Method 1, 61.4% vs. 54.4%, P = 0.024; Method 2, 62.7% vs. 53.5%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for a variety of demographic and health-related variables, the presence of DM was no longer associated with supplementation for Method 1 (odds ratio [OR] 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-1.32; P = 0.925) or Method 2 (OR 1.13; 95% CI 0.91-1.41; P = 0.238). Approximately four of every five products taken for the purpose of managing DM were self-prescribed, the most common being multivitamins-minerals, cinnamon-containing supplements, and chromium-containing supplements. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly more than six out of 10 Americans with DM use dietary supplements each month and, although this is higher than Americans without DM, it does not appear to be due to DM per se. SN - 1753-0407 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29938914/Population_representative_analysis_of_dietary_supplementation_among_Americans_with_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-0407.12815 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -