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Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity.
Nutrients 2018; 10(7)N

Abstract

Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disease with autoimmune features that is triggered and maintained by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley, and rye. Prevalence of celiac disease is increased in patients with mono- and/or polyglandular autoimmunity and their relatives. We have reviewed the current and pertinent literature that addresses the close association between celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity. The close relationship between celiac disease and glandular autoimmunity can be largely explained by sharing of a common genetic background. Further, between 10 and 30% of patients with celiac disease are thyroid and/or type 1 diabetes antibody positive, while around 5⁻7% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, and/or polyglandular autoimmunity are IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody positive. While a gluten free diet does not reverse glandular autoimmunity, its early institution may delay or even prevent its first manifestation. In conclusion, this brief review highlighting the close association between celiac disease and both monoglandular and polyglandular autoimmunity, aims to underline the need for prospective studies to establish whether an early diagnosis of celiac disease and a prompt gluten-free diet may positively impact the evolution and manifestation of glandular autoimmunity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine I, Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, 55101 Mainz, Germany. george.kahaly@unimedizin-mainz.de.Department of Medicine I, Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, 55101 Mainz, Germany. Lara.Frommer@unimedizin-mainz.de.Institute for Translational Immunology and Research Center for Immunotherapy (FZI), Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, 55101 Mainz, Germany. Detlef.Schuppan@unimedizin-mainz.de. Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Detlef.Schuppan@unimedizin-mainz.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29941778

Citation

Kahaly, George J., et al. "Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity." Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 7, 2018.
Kahaly GJ, Frommer L, Schuppan D. Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity. Nutrients. 2018;10(7).
Kahaly, G. J., Frommer, L., & Schuppan, D. (2018). Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity. Nutrients, 10(7), doi:10.3390/nu10070814.
Kahaly GJ, Frommer L, Schuppan D. Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity. Nutrients. 2018 Jun 25;10(7) PubMed PMID: 29941778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Celiac Disease and Glandular Autoimmunity. AU - Kahaly,George J, AU - Frommer,Lara, AU - Schuppan,Detlef, Y1 - 2018/06/25/ PY - 2018/06/06/received PY - 2018/06/19/revised PY - 2018/06/21/accepted PY - 2018/6/27/entrez PY - 2018/6/27/pubmed PY - 2018/10/24/medline KW - autoimmune thyroid disease KW - celiac disease KW - glandular autoimmunity KW - polyglandular autoimmune syndrome KW - type 1 diabetes JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 10 IS - 7 N2 - Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disease with autoimmune features that is triggered and maintained by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley, and rye. Prevalence of celiac disease is increased in patients with mono- and/or polyglandular autoimmunity and their relatives. We have reviewed the current and pertinent literature that addresses the close association between celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity. The close relationship between celiac disease and glandular autoimmunity can be largely explained by sharing of a common genetic background. Further, between 10 and 30% of patients with celiac disease are thyroid and/or type 1 diabetes antibody positive, while around 5⁻7% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, and/or polyglandular autoimmunity are IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody positive. While a gluten free diet does not reverse glandular autoimmunity, its early institution may delay or even prevent its first manifestation. In conclusion, this brief review highlighting the close association between celiac disease and both monoglandular and polyglandular autoimmunity, aims to underline the need for prospective studies to establish whether an early diagnosis of celiac disease and a prompt gluten-free diet may positively impact the evolution and manifestation of glandular autoimmunity. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29941778/Celiac_Disease_and_Glandular_Autoimmunity_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu10070814 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -