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Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Int J Cancer 2019; 144(2):240-250IJ

Abstract

The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, and Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas-School of Public Health, Houston, Texas. Division of Urology, The University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, and Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. First Department of Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Services, University of Athens Medical School, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece.Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. 2nd Pulmonary Medicine Department, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, "ATTIKON" University Hospital, Haidari, Greece.Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain.CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs. GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Donostia, Spain.Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy.Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori via Venezian 1, Milan, Italy.Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Sweden.Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Sweden. Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.Department of Clinical Sciences, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, 205 02, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Clinical Sciences, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, 205 02, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway.University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, and Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29943826

Citation

Sen, Abhijit, et al. "Coffee and Tea Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 144, no. 2, 2019, pp. 240-250.
Sen A, Papadimitriou N, Lagiou P, et al. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int J Cancer. 2019;144(2):240-250.
Sen, A., Papadimitriou, N., Lagiou, P., Perez-Cornago, A., Travis, R. C., Key, T. J., ... Tsilidis, K. K. (2019). Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 144(2), pp. 240-250. doi:10.1002/ijc.31634.
Sen A, et al. Coffee and Tea Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition. Int J Cancer. 2019 01 15;144(2):240-250. PubMed PMID: 29943826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. AU - Sen,Abhijit, AU - Papadimitriou,Nikos, AU - Lagiou,Pagona, AU - Perez-Cornago,Aurora, AU - Travis,Ruth C, AU - Key,Timothy J, AU - Murphy,Neil, AU - Gunter,Marc, AU - Freisling,Heinz, AU - Tzoulaki,Ioanna, AU - Muller,David C, AU - Cross,Amanda J, AU - Lopez,David S, AU - Bergmann,Manuela, AU - Boeing,Heiner, AU - Bamia,Christina, AU - Kotanidou,Anastasia, AU - Karakatsani,Anna, AU - Tjønneland,Anne, AU - Kyrø,Cecilie, AU - Outzen,Malene, AU - Redondo,María-Luisa, AU - Cayssials,Valerie, AU - Chirlaque,Maria-Dolores, AU - Barricarte,Aurelio, AU - Sánchez,Maria-Jose, AU - Larrañaga,Nerea, AU - Tumino,Rosario, AU - Grioni,Sara, AU - Palli,Domenico, AU - Caini,Saverio, AU - Sacerdote,Carlotta, AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita,Bas, AU - Kühn,Tilman, AU - Kaaks,Rudolf, AU - Nilsson,Lena Maria, AU - Landberg,Rikard, AU - Wallström,Peter, AU - Drake,Isabel, AU - Bech,Bodil Hammer, AU - Overvad,Kim, AU - Aune,Dagfinn, AU - Khaw,Kay-Tee, AU - Riboli,Elio, AU - Trichopoulos,Dimitrios, AU - Trichopoulou,Antonia, AU - Tsilidis,Konstantinos K, Y1 - 2018/11/16/ PY - 2018/04/02/received PY - 2018/05/06/revised PY - 2018/05/08/accepted PY - 2018/6/27/pubmed PY - 2019/4/6/medline PY - 2018/6/27/entrez KW - EPIC KW - caffeinated KW - coffee KW - decaffeinated KW - prostate cancer KW - tea SP - 240 EP - 250 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 144 IS - 2 N2 - The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29943826/Coffee_and_tea_consumption_and_risk_of_prostate_cancer_in_the_European_Prospective_Investigation_into_Cancer_and_Nutrition_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31634 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -