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Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank.

Abstract

Context

Vitamin D may be a modifiable risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Objectives

We tested the hypothesis that plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are causally associated with risk of Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).

Design, Setting, Patients, and Interventions

We used a Mendelian randomization design to study 120,013 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Copenhagen General Population Study, and a Copenhagen-based cohort of patients with IBD. Of these, 35,558 individuals had plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements available, and 115,110 were genotyped for rs7944926 and rs11234027 in DHCR7 and rs10741657 and rs12794714 in CYP2R1, all variants associated with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. We identified 653 cases of CD and 1265 cases of UC, of which 58 and 113, respectively, had 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements available. We also included genetic data from 408,455 individuals from the UK Biobank, including 1707 CD cases and 3147 UC cases.

Main Outcome Measure

Hazard ratios for higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

Results

The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for 10 nmol/L higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level were 1.04 (95% CI: 0.93 to 1.16) for CD and 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06 to 1.21) for UC. A combined 25-hydroxyvitamin D allele score was associated with a 1.4-nmol/L increase in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and hazard ratios of 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94 to 1.03) for CD and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97 to 1.05) for UC. Combining genetic data from the Copenhagen studies and the UK Biobank, genetically determined vitamin D did not appear to influence the risk of CD or UC.

Conclusions

Our results do not support a major role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

    ,

    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.

    ,

    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.

    ,

    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.

    ,

    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.

    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. The Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. The Copenhagen City Heart Study, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Biological Specimen Banks
    Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Cytochrome P450 Family 2
    Denmark
    Female
    Genotype
    Humans
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
    Male
    Mendelian Randomization Analysis
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    United Kingdom
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Observational Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29947775

    Citation

    Lund-Nielsen, Josephine, et al. "Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 103, no. 9, 2018, pp. 3267-3277.
    Lund-Nielsen J, Vedel-Krogh S, Kobylecki CJ, et al. Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018;103(9):3267-3277.
    Lund-Nielsen, J., Vedel-Krogh, S., Kobylecki, C. J., Brynskov, J., Afzal, S., & Nordestgaard, B. G. (2018). Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 103(9), pp. 3267-3277. doi:10.1210/jc.2018-00250.
    Lund-Nielsen J, et al. Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 09 1;103(9):3267-3277. PubMed PMID: 29947775.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mendelian Randomization Analyses in the Copenhagen Studies and UK Biobank. AU - Lund-Nielsen,Josephine, AU - Vedel-Krogh,Signe, AU - Kobylecki,Camilla Jannie, AU - Brynskov,Jørn, AU - Afzal,Shoaib, AU - Nordestgaard,Børge G, PY - 2018/01/30/received PY - 2018/06/21/accepted PY - 2018/6/28/pubmed PY - 2019/5/29/medline PY - 2018/6/28/entrez SP - 3267 EP - 3277 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 103 IS - 9 N2 - Context: Vitamin D may be a modifiable risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are causally associated with risk of Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Design, Setting, Patients, and Interventions: We used a Mendelian randomization design to study 120,013 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Copenhagen General Population Study, and a Copenhagen-based cohort of patients with IBD. Of these, 35,558 individuals had plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements available, and 115,110 were genotyped for rs7944926 and rs11234027 in DHCR7 and rs10741657 and rs12794714 in CYP2R1, all variants associated with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. We identified 653 cases of CD and 1265 cases of UC, of which 58 and 113, respectively, had 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements available. We also included genetic data from 408,455 individuals from the UK Biobank, including 1707 CD cases and 3147 UC cases. Main Outcome Measure: Hazard ratios for higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results: The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for 10 nmol/L higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level were 1.04 (95% CI: 0.93 to 1.16) for CD and 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06 to 1.21) for UC. A combined 25-hydroxyvitamin D allele score was associated with a 1.4-nmol/L increase in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and hazard ratios of 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94 to 1.03) for CD and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97 to 1.05) for UC. Combining genetic data from the Copenhagen studies and the UK Biobank, genetically determined vitamin D did not appear to influence the risk of CD or UC. Conclusions: Our results do not support a major role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD. SN - 1945-7197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29947775/Vitamin_D_and_Inflammatory_Bowel_Disease:_Mendelian_Randomization_Analyses_in_the_Copenhagen_Studies_and_UK_Biobank_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2018-00250 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -