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Lean non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had comparable total caloric, carbohydrate, protein, fat, iron, sleep duration and overtime work as obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2019; 34(1):256-262JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multifactorial disease that involves a complex interaction between genetics, diet, and lifestyle. Although closely related with obese subjects, it is also common in lean humans. This study aimed to characterize the diet and lifestyle of lean and obese NAFLD patients in China.

METHODS

To characterize the diet and lifestyle of lean and obese NAFLD patients, we conducted a matched case-control study that included 351 Chinese adults. General characteristics, dietary intake, and lifestyle were gathered by using a valid and reliable dietary questionnaire. We compared the dietary intake and lifestyle between lean and obese NAFLD patients.

RESULTS

All NAFLD patients had more total caloric, calorigenic nutrients (carbohydrate, fat, and protein), grain, potato, fruit, and iron with higher levels of waist circumference and overtime work but shorter sleep duration than their corresponding controls. Particularly, lean NAFLD patients consumed comparable total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, iron, sleep duration, and overtime work as obese NAFLD patients, though they consumed lower levels of grain, potato, and fruit (lean NAFLD patients vs. obese NAFLD patients: mean ± SD, g/day grain: 291.8 ± 83.8, 365.2 ± 89.0; potato: 63.5 ± 33.1, 80.4 ± 37.6; fruit: 324.3 ± 148.4, 414.0 ± 220.4; P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had higher total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, grain, potato, fruit, iron, and overtime work but shorter sleep duration. Lean NAFLD patients had comparable total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, iron, sleep duration, and overtime work as obese NAFLD patients. These features could be used to the nutritional education and therapeutic guidance for lean NAFLD patients in the future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.College of Bioinformatics Science and Technology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China.Dalian Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dalian, Liaoning Province, China.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29949199

Citation

Li, Chunlong, et al. "Lean Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients Had Comparable Total Caloric, Carbohydrate, Protein, Fat, Iron, Sleep Duration and Overtime Work as Obese Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 34, no. 1, 2019, pp. 256-262.
Li C, Guo P, Okekunle AP, et al. Lean non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had comparable total caloric, carbohydrate, protein, fat, iron, sleep duration and overtime work as obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;34(1):256-262.
Li, C., Guo, P., Okekunle, A. P., Ji, X., Huang, M., Qi, J., ... Li, R. (2019). Lean non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had comparable total caloric, carbohydrate, protein, fat, iron, sleep duration and overtime work as obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 34(1), pp. 256-262. doi:10.1111/jgh.14360.
Li C, et al. Lean Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients Had Comparable Total Caloric, Carbohydrate, Protein, Fat, Iron, Sleep Duration and Overtime Work as Obese Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;34(1):256-262. PubMed PMID: 29949199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lean non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had comparable total caloric, carbohydrate, protein, fat, iron, sleep duration and overtime work as obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients. AU - Li,Chunlong, AU - Guo,Panpan, AU - Okekunle,Akinkunmi Paul, AU - Ji,Xiaoning, AU - Huang,Min, AU - Qi,Jiayue, AU - Jiang,Yongshuai, AU - Feng,Rennan, AU - Li,Rui, Y1 - 2018/07/16/ PY - 2018/01/27/received PY - 2018/03/30/revised PY - 2018/06/11/accepted PY - 2018/6/28/pubmed PY - 2018/6/28/medline PY - 2018/6/28/entrez KW - NAFLD KW - diet KW - lean KW - lifestyle KW - obese SP - 256 EP - 262 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multifactorial disease that involves a complex interaction between genetics, diet, and lifestyle. Although closely related with obese subjects, it is also common in lean humans. This study aimed to characterize the diet and lifestyle of lean and obese NAFLD patients in China. METHODS: To characterize the diet and lifestyle of lean and obese NAFLD patients, we conducted a matched case-control study that included 351 Chinese adults. General characteristics, dietary intake, and lifestyle were gathered by using a valid and reliable dietary questionnaire. We compared the dietary intake and lifestyle between lean and obese NAFLD patients. RESULTS: All NAFLD patients had more total caloric, calorigenic nutrients (carbohydrate, fat, and protein), grain, potato, fruit, and iron with higher levels of waist circumference and overtime work but shorter sleep duration than their corresponding controls. Particularly, lean NAFLD patients consumed comparable total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, iron, sleep duration, and overtime work as obese NAFLD patients, though they consumed lower levels of grain, potato, and fruit (lean NAFLD patients vs. obese NAFLD patients: mean ± SD, g/day grain: 291.8 ± 83.8, 365.2 ± 89.0; potato: 63.5 ± 33.1, 80.4 ± 37.6; fruit: 324.3 ± 148.4, 414.0 ± 220.4; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients had higher total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, grain, potato, fruit, iron, and overtime work but shorter sleep duration. Lean NAFLD patients had comparable total caloric, calorigenic nutrients, iron, sleep duration, and overtime work as obese NAFLD patients. These features could be used to the nutritional education and therapeutic guidance for lean NAFLD patients in the future. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29949199/Lean_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_patients_had_comparable_total_caloric_carbohydrate_protein_fat_iron_sleep_duration_and_overtime_work_as_obese_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgh.14360 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -