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Similar controls on calcification under ocean acidification across unrelated coral reef taxa.
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 10; 24(10):4857-4868.GC

Abstract

Ocean acidification (OA) is a major threat to marine ecosystems, particularly coral reefs which are heavily reliant on calcareous species. OA decreases seawater pH and calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω), and increases the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Intense scientific effort has attempted to determine the mechanisms via which ocean acidification (OA) influences calcification, led by early hypotheses that calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω) is the main driver. We grew corals and coralline algae for 8-21 weeks, under treatments where the seawater parameters Ω, pH, and DIC were manipulated to examine their differential effects on calcification rates and calcifying fluid chemistry (Ωcf , pHcf , and DICcf). Here, using long duration experiments, we provide geochemical evidence that differing physiological controls on carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification, rather than seawater Ω, are the main determinants of calcification. We found that changes in seawater pH and DIC rather than Ω had the greatest effects on calcification and calcifying fluid chemistry, though the effects of seawater carbonate chemistry were limited. Our results demonstrate the capacity of organisms from taxa with vastly different calcification mechanisms to regulate their internal chemistry under extreme chemical conditions. These findings provide an explanation for the resistance of some species to OA, while also demonstrating how changes in seawater DIC and pH under OA influence calcification of key coral reef taxa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oceans Graduate School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Crawley, WA, Australia. Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, CNRS-INSU, Sorbonne Université, Villefranche-sur-mer, France.Oceans Graduate School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Crawley, WA, Australia.Oceans Graduate School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Crawley, WA, Australia.Oceans Graduate School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Fachbereich 2 Biologie/Chemie, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.Oceans Graduate School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Crawley, WA, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29957854

Citation

Comeau, Steeve, et al. "Similar Controls On Calcification Under Ocean Acidification Across Unrelated Coral Reef Taxa." Global Change Biology, vol. 24, no. 10, 2018, pp. 4857-4868.
Comeau S, Cornwall CE, DeCarlo TM, et al. Similar controls on calcification under ocean acidification across unrelated coral reef taxa. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(10):4857-4868.
Comeau, S., Cornwall, C. E., DeCarlo, T. M., Krieger, E., & McCulloch, M. T. (2018). Similar controls on calcification under ocean acidification across unrelated coral reef taxa. Global Change Biology, 24(10), 4857-4868. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14379
Comeau S, et al. Similar Controls On Calcification Under Ocean Acidification Across Unrelated Coral Reef Taxa. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(10):4857-4868. PubMed PMID: 29957854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Similar controls on calcification under ocean acidification across unrelated coral reef taxa. AU - Comeau,Steeve, AU - Cornwall,Christopher E, AU - DeCarlo,Thomas M, AU - Krieger,Erik, AU - McCulloch,Malcolm T, Y1 - 2018/08/01/ PY - 2018/03/26/received PY - 2018/06/07/revised PY - 2018/06/12/accepted PY - 2018/6/30/pubmed PY - 2019/1/23/medline PY - 2018/6/30/entrez KW - calcifying fluid KW - calcium KW - coral KW - coralline alga KW - dissolved inorganic carbon KW - pH KW - physiology SP - 4857 EP - 4868 JF - Global change biology JO - Glob Chang Biol VL - 24 IS - 10 N2 - Ocean acidification (OA) is a major threat to marine ecosystems, particularly coral reefs which are heavily reliant on calcareous species. OA decreases seawater pH and calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω), and increases the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Intense scientific effort has attempted to determine the mechanisms via which ocean acidification (OA) influences calcification, led by early hypotheses that calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω) is the main driver. We grew corals and coralline algae for 8-21 weeks, under treatments where the seawater parameters Ω, pH, and DIC were manipulated to examine their differential effects on calcification rates and calcifying fluid chemistry (Ωcf , pHcf , and DICcf). Here, using long duration experiments, we provide geochemical evidence that differing physiological controls on carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification, rather than seawater Ω, are the main determinants of calcification. We found that changes in seawater pH and DIC rather than Ω had the greatest effects on calcification and calcifying fluid chemistry, though the effects of seawater carbonate chemistry were limited. Our results demonstrate the capacity of organisms from taxa with vastly different calcification mechanisms to regulate their internal chemistry under extreme chemical conditions. These findings provide an explanation for the resistance of some species to OA, while also demonstrating how changes in seawater DIC and pH under OA influence calcification of key coral reef taxa. SN - 1365-2486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29957854/Similar_controls_on_calcification_under_ocean_acidification_across_unrelated_coral_reef_taxa_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14379 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -