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Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa.
AIDS Behav. 2018 Jul; 22(Suppl 1):114-120.AB

Abstract

As part of the Mother-Infant Health Study, we describe infant feeding practices among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers over a 12-month period when the Western Cape Province prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program was transitioning from a policy of exclusive formula feeding to one of exclusive breastfeeding. Two hundred pairs of mother and HIV-uninfected infant were included in the analysis, among whom 81 women were HIV uninfected and breastfeeding. Of the 119 HIV-infected mothers, 50 (42%) were breastfeeding and 69 (58%) were formula feeding. HIV-infected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.14 (7.71-15.86) weeks; HIV-uninfected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.29 (8.0-16.0) weeks; and HIV-infected mothers predominantly formula fed for 50.29 (36.43-51.43) weeks. A woman's HIV status had no influence on the time to stopping predominant breastfeeding (P = 0.20). Our findings suggest suboptimal duration of breastfeeding among both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers. Providing support for all mothers postdelivery, regardless of their HIV status, may improve breastfeeding practices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Francie van Zijl Drive, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa. moleenz@sun.ac.za. Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Global Health, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. moleenz@sun.ac.za.Department of Pathology, Immunology Unit, National Health Laboratory Service, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Francie van Zijl Drive, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa. School of Population & Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.Vaccine Evaluation Center, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Washington, DC, USA.Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, Stellenbosch University, Francie van Zijl Drive, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29959720

Citation

Zunza, Moleen, et al. "Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa." AIDS and Behavior, vol. 22, no. Suppl 1, 2018, pp. 114-120.
Zunza M, Esser M, Slogrove A, et al. Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa. AIDS Behav. 2018;22(Suppl 1):114-120.
Zunza, M., Esser, M., Slogrove, A., Bettinger, J. A., Machekano, R., & Cotton, M. F. (2018). Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa. AIDS and Behavior, 22(Suppl 1), 114-120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2208-0
Zunza M, et al. Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa. AIDS Behav. 2018;22(Suppl 1):114-120. PubMed PMID: 29959720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early Breastfeeding Cessation Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Western Cape Province, South Africa. AU - Zunza,Moleen, AU - Esser,Monika, AU - Slogrove,Amy, AU - Bettinger,Julie A, AU - Machekano,Rhoderick, AU - Cotton,Mark F, AU - ,, PY - 2018/7/1/pubmed PY - 2019/6/7/medline PY - 2018/7/1/entrez KW - Early breastfeeding cessation KW - HIV/AIDS KW - Prevention of mother-to-child transmission SP - 114 EP - 120 JF - AIDS and behavior JO - AIDS Behav VL - 22 IS - Suppl 1 N2 - As part of the Mother-Infant Health Study, we describe infant feeding practices among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers over a 12-month period when the Western Cape Province prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program was transitioning from a policy of exclusive formula feeding to one of exclusive breastfeeding. Two hundred pairs of mother and HIV-uninfected infant were included in the analysis, among whom 81 women were HIV uninfected and breastfeeding. Of the 119 HIV-infected mothers, 50 (42%) were breastfeeding and 69 (58%) were formula feeding. HIV-infected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.14 (7.71-15.86) weeks; HIV-uninfected mothers predominantly breastfed for 8.29 (8.0-16.0) weeks; and HIV-infected mothers predominantly formula fed for 50.29 (36.43-51.43) weeks. A woman's HIV status had no influence on the time to stopping predominant breastfeeding (P = 0.20). Our findings suggest suboptimal duration of breastfeeding among both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers. Providing support for all mothers postdelivery, regardless of their HIV status, may improve breastfeeding practices. SN - 1573-3254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29959720/Early_Breastfeeding_Cessation_Among_HIV_Infected_and_HIV_Uninfected_Women_in_Western_Cape_Province_South_Africa_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2208-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -