Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hyperhomocysteinemia influenced malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients.
Neurol Sci. 2018 Oct; 39(10):1691-1695.NS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with many motor and non-motor symptoms. Hyperhomocysteinemia is reported in many PD patients. Homocysteine (Hcy) is reported to be a risk factor for some PD non-motor symptoms.

AIM

The aim was to analyze Hcy level and its correlation with physical activity and motor and some non-motor symptoms (depression and cognition) in PD patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Patients were surveyed for physical activity and demographic data. Blood samples were obtained for Hcy, vitamin B12, and folic acid determination. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts III and IV, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess nutritional status, disease stage, and motor and some non-motor symptoms (depression and cognition) of PD in study patients.

RESULTS

We analyzed 34 PD patients. Elevated Hcy level was found in 70.6% of these patients. Patients reporting regular exercise had lower Hcy level (p < 0.025). Hcy level yielded a statistically significant correlation with MNA score (rs = - 0.510; p < 0.003), UPDRS part III (rs = 0.372; p < 0.030), vitamin B12 (rs = - 0.519; p < 0.002), and folic acid (rs = - 0.502; p < 0.003) but not with cognition and depression. There were no statistically significant differences in Hcy level for disease stage either for dyskinesia or "off" periods.

CONCLUSION

PD patients are at a risk of hyperhomocysteinemia. Regular physical activity decreases Hcy level, whereas poor motor function increases it. There is correlation between Hcy level and malnutrition in PD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia. svetlana.tomic@vip.hr. School of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek, Osijek, Croatia. svetlana.tomic@vip.hr.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia. School of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia. School of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia. School of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.Clinical Department of Neurology, Osijek University Hospital Center, J. Huttlera 4, HR-31000, Osijek, Croatia. School of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek, Osijek, Croatia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29961201

Citation

Tomic, Svetlana, et al. "Hyperhomocysteinemia Influenced Malnutrition in Parkinson's Disease Patients." Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 39, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1691-1695.
Tomic S, Pekic V, Popijac Z, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia influenced malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Neurol Sci. 2018;39(10):1691-1695.
Tomic, S., Pekic, V., Popijac, Z., Pucic, T., Vinkovic, M. P., Kuric, T. G., & Popovic, Z. (2018). Hyperhomocysteinemia influenced malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology, 39(10), 1691-1695. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10072-018-3480-5
Tomic S, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia Influenced Malnutrition in Parkinson's Disease Patients. Neurol Sci. 2018;39(10):1691-1695. PubMed PMID: 29961201.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperhomocysteinemia influenced malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. AU - Tomic,Svetlana, AU - Pekic,Vlasta, AU - Popijac,Zeljka, AU - Pucic,Tomislav, AU - Vinkovic,Marta Petek, AU - Kuric,Tihana Gilman, AU - Popovic,Zvonimir, Y1 - 2018/06/30/ PY - 2018/01/14/received PY - 2018/06/20/accepted PY - 2018/7/2/pubmed PY - 2018/11/6/medline PY - 2018/7/2/entrez KW - Hyperhomocysteinemia KW - Malnutrition KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - Physical activity SP - 1691 EP - 1695 JF - Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology JO - Neurol Sci VL - 39 IS - 10 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with many motor and non-motor symptoms. Hyperhomocysteinemia is reported in many PD patients. Homocysteine (Hcy) is reported to be a risk factor for some PD non-motor symptoms. AIM: The aim was to analyze Hcy level and its correlation with physical activity and motor and some non-motor symptoms (depression and cognition) in PD patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were surveyed for physical activity and demographic data. Blood samples were obtained for Hcy, vitamin B12, and folic acid determination. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts III and IV, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess nutritional status, disease stage, and motor and some non-motor symptoms (depression and cognition) of PD in study patients. RESULTS: We analyzed 34 PD patients. Elevated Hcy level was found in 70.6% of these patients. Patients reporting regular exercise had lower Hcy level (p < 0.025). Hcy level yielded a statistically significant correlation with MNA score (rs = - 0.510; p < 0.003), UPDRS part III (rs = 0.372; p < 0.030), vitamin B12 (rs = - 0.519; p < 0.002), and folic acid (rs = - 0.502; p < 0.003) but not with cognition and depression. There were no statistically significant differences in Hcy level for disease stage either for dyskinesia or "off" periods. CONCLUSION: PD patients are at a risk of hyperhomocysteinemia. Regular physical activity decreases Hcy level, whereas poor motor function increases it. There is correlation between Hcy level and malnutrition in PD patients. SN - 1590-3478 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29961201/Hyperhomocysteinemia_influenced_malnutrition_in_Parkinson's_disease_patients_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10072-018-3480-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -