Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of dietary fiber in insulin-dependent diabetics: insulin requirements and serum lipids.
J Am Diet Assoc. 1985 Nov; 85(11):1455-61.JA

Abstract

Four young adult (18 to 26 years old), nonobese human subjects (two men and two women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus volunteered to consume a series of three diets: baseline (normal daily intake), wheat bran (normal daily intake + 78 gm wheat bran per day), and cellulose (normal daily intake + 30 gm cellulose per day). Wheat bran and cellulose diets both contained 60 gm dietary fiber, with 50% of the dietary fiber from wheat bran or cellulose, respectively. Each patient served as his or her own control. Randomized diets were of 6 weeks' duration, separated by a 4-week "recovery" period. At the conclusion of each diet, subjects were hospitalized and underwent 12 hours of computer-controlled, insulin-glucose infusions. Significant decreases were seen in fasting cholesterol (p less than .05), but the decreases seemed to result largely from the significant reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A large reduction in triglycerides was noted with cellulose feeding but not with wheat bran. The mean daily insulin dose decreased (p less than .05) in response to fiber addition (8% and 10% decrease for wheat bran and cellulose feeding, respectively). Mean biostator insulin requirements decreased 11% with wheat bran (p less than .05) but not with cellulose. During biostator monitoring, subjects experienced delayed postprandial blood glucose and insulin-infusion rate peaks with both wheat bran and cellulose feeding. The wheat bran diet reduced peak blood glucose concentration and peak insulin infusion rate in comparison with baseline and cellulose diets. The data suggest that high levels of cellulose or wheat bran are of marginal benefit to insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2997314

Citation

Harold, M R., et al. "Effect of Dietary Fiber in Insulin-dependent Diabetics: Insulin Requirements and Serum Lipids." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 85, no. 11, 1985, pp. 1455-61.
Harold MR, Reeves RD, Bolze MS, et al. Effect of dietary fiber in insulin-dependent diabetics: insulin requirements and serum lipids. J Am Diet Assoc. 1985;85(11):1455-61.
Harold, M. R., Reeves, R. D., Bolze, M. S., Guthrie, R. A., & Guthrie, D. W. (1985). Effect of dietary fiber in insulin-dependent diabetics: insulin requirements and serum lipids. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 85(11), 1455-61.
Harold MR, et al. Effect of Dietary Fiber in Insulin-dependent Diabetics: Insulin Requirements and Serum Lipids. J Am Diet Assoc. 1985;85(11):1455-61. PubMed PMID: 2997314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of dietary fiber in insulin-dependent diabetics: insulin requirements and serum lipids. AU - Harold,M R, AU - Reeves,R D, AU - Bolze,M S, AU - Guthrie,R A, AU - Guthrie,D W, PY - 1985/11/1/pubmed PY - 1985/11/1/medline PY - 1985/11/1/entrez SP - 1455 EP - 61 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 85 IS - 11 N2 - Four young adult (18 to 26 years old), nonobese human subjects (two men and two women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus volunteered to consume a series of three diets: baseline (normal daily intake), wheat bran (normal daily intake + 78 gm wheat bran per day), and cellulose (normal daily intake + 30 gm cellulose per day). Wheat bran and cellulose diets both contained 60 gm dietary fiber, with 50% of the dietary fiber from wheat bran or cellulose, respectively. Each patient served as his or her own control. Randomized diets were of 6 weeks' duration, separated by a 4-week "recovery" period. At the conclusion of each diet, subjects were hospitalized and underwent 12 hours of computer-controlled, insulin-glucose infusions. Significant decreases were seen in fasting cholesterol (p less than .05), but the decreases seemed to result largely from the significant reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A large reduction in triglycerides was noted with cellulose feeding but not with wheat bran. The mean daily insulin dose decreased (p less than .05) in response to fiber addition (8% and 10% decrease for wheat bran and cellulose feeding, respectively). Mean biostator insulin requirements decreased 11% with wheat bran (p less than .05) but not with cellulose. During biostator monitoring, subjects experienced delayed postprandial blood glucose and insulin-infusion rate peaks with both wheat bran and cellulose feeding. The wheat bran diet reduced peak blood glucose concentration and peak insulin infusion rate in comparison with baseline and cellulose diets. The data suggest that high levels of cellulose or wheat bran are of marginal benefit to insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2997314/Effect_of_dietary_fiber_in_insulin_dependent_diabetics:_insulin_requirements_and_serum_lipids_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dietaryfiber.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -