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Diet as a moderator in the association of sedentary behaviors with inflammatory biomarkers among adolescents in the HELENA study.
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Aug; 58(5):2051-2065.EJ

Abstract

AIM

To assess if a healthy diet might attenuate the positive sedentary-inflammation relation, whereas an unhealthy diet may increase the effect of sedentary behaviors on inflammatory biomarkers.

METHODS

In 618 adolescents (13-17 years) of the European HELENA study, data were available on body composition, a set of inflammation markers, and food intake assessed by a self-administered computerized 24 h dietary recall for 2 days. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and an antioxidant-rich diet z-score were used as dietary indices and tested as moderators. A set of low-grade inflammatory characteristics was used as outcome: several cytokines in an inflammatory ratio (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, TGFβ-1), C-reactive protein, three cell-adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sE-selectin), three cardiovascular risk markers (GGT, ALT, homocysteine) and three immune cell types (white blood cells, lymphocytes, CD3). Sedentary behaviors were self-reported and analyzed as total screen time. Multiple linear regression analyses tested moderation by diet in the sedentary behaviors-inflammation association adjusted for age, sex, country, adiposity (sum of six skinfolds), parental education, and socio-economic status.

RESULTS

Both diet scores, Mediterranean and antioxidant-rich diet, were significant protective moderators in the effect of sedentary behaviors on alanine-transaminase enzyme (P = 0.014; P = 0.027), and on the pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine ratio (P = 0.001; P = 0.004), but not on other inflammatory parameters.

CONCLUSION

A higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet or an antioxidant-rich diet may attenuate the onset of oxidative stress signs associated by sedentary behaviors, whereas a poor diet seems to increase inflammation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Block K3-4th floor, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. aline.barbedoarouca@ugent.be.GENUD: "Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development" Research Group, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, University of Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain.GENUD: "Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development" Research Group, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, University of Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain.Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Technology and Nutrition, Madrid, Spain.Department of Pediatrics, Div. Nutrition and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.Faculty of Medicine, University Lille, Lille, France.Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Crete, Greece.Research Department of Child Nutrition, Pediatric University Clinic, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Granada University, Granada, Spain.Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Research Center for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy.Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Block K3-4th floor, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.ImFINE Research Group. Department of Health and Human Performance, Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain.School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Block K3-4th floor, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Block K3-4th floor, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29974229

Citation

Arouca, Aline B., et al. "Diet as a Moderator in the Association of Sedentary Behaviors With Inflammatory Biomarkers Among Adolescents in the HELENA Study." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 5, 2019, pp. 2051-2065.
Arouca AB, Santaliestra-Pasías AM, Moreno LA, et al. Diet as a moderator in the association of sedentary behaviors with inflammatory biomarkers among adolescents in the HELENA study. Eur J Nutr. 2019;58(5):2051-2065.
Arouca, A. B., Santaliestra-Pasías, A. M., Moreno, L. A., Marcos, A., Widhalm, K., Molnár, D., Manios, Y., Gottrand, F., Kafatos, A., Kersting, M., Sjöström, M., Sáinz, Á. G., Ferrari, M., Huybrechts, I., González-Gross, M., Forsner, M., De Henauw, S., & Michels, N. (2019). Diet as a moderator in the association of sedentary behaviors with inflammatory biomarkers among adolescents in the HELENA study. European Journal of Nutrition, 58(5), 2051-2065. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-1764-4
Arouca AB, et al. Diet as a Moderator in the Association of Sedentary Behaviors With Inflammatory Biomarkers Among Adolescents in the HELENA Study. Eur J Nutr. 2019;58(5):2051-2065. PubMed PMID: 29974229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet as a moderator in the association of sedentary behaviors with inflammatory biomarkers among adolescents in the HELENA study. AU - Arouca,Aline B, AU - Santaliestra-Pasías,Alba M, AU - Moreno,Luis A, AU - Marcos,Ascensión, AU - Widhalm,Kurt, AU - Molnár,Dénes, AU - Manios,Yannis, AU - Gottrand,Frederic, AU - Kafatos,Anthony, AU - Kersting,Mathilde, AU - Sjöström,Michael, AU - Sáinz,Ángel Gutiérrez, AU - Ferrari,Marika, AU - Huybrechts,Inge, AU - González-Gross,Marcela, AU - Forsner,Maria, AU - De Henauw,Stefaan, AU - Michels,Nathalie, AU - ,, Y1 - 2018/07/04/ PY - 2017/12/14/received PY - 2018/06/26/accepted PY - 2018/7/6/pubmed PY - 2020/1/31/medline PY - 2018/7/6/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - HELENA study KW - Low-grade inflammation KW - Mediterranean diet KW - Moderation KW - Sedentary behavior SP - 2051 EP - 2065 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 58 IS - 5 N2 - AIM: To assess if a healthy diet might attenuate the positive sedentary-inflammation relation, whereas an unhealthy diet may increase the effect of sedentary behaviors on inflammatory biomarkers. METHODS: In 618 adolescents (13-17 years) of the European HELENA study, data were available on body composition, a set of inflammation markers, and food intake assessed by a self-administered computerized 24 h dietary recall for 2 days. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and an antioxidant-rich diet z-score were used as dietary indices and tested as moderators. A set of low-grade inflammatory characteristics was used as outcome: several cytokines in an inflammatory ratio (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, TGFβ-1), C-reactive protein, three cell-adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sE-selectin), three cardiovascular risk markers (GGT, ALT, homocysteine) and three immune cell types (white blood cells, lymphocytes, CD3). Sedentary behaviors were self-reported and analyzed as total screen time. Multiple linear regression analyses tested moderation by diet in the sedentary behaviors-inflammation association adjusted for age, sex, country, adiposity (sum of six skinfolds), parental education, and socio-economic status. RESULTS: Both diet scores, Mediterranean and antioxidant-rich diet, were significant protective moderators in the effect of sedentary behaviors on alanine-transaminase enzyme (P = 0.014; P = 0.027), and on the pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine ratio (P = 0.001; P = 0.004), but not on other inflammatory parameters. CONCLUSION: A higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet or an antioxidant-rich diet may attenuate the onset of oxidative stress signs associated by sedentary behaviors, whereas a poor diet seems to increase inflammation. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29974229/Diet_as_a_moderator_in_the_association_of_sedentary_behaviors_with_inflammatory_biomarkers_among_adolescents_in_the_HELENA_study L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-1764-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -