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Additive effects of orthokeratology and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution in slowing axial elongation in children with myopia: first year results.
Jpn J Ophthalmol. 2018 Sep; 62(5):544-553.JJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the additive effects of orthokeratology (OK) and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution, both of which are effective procedures to slow axial elongation in children with myopia.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective randomized clinical trial.

METHODS

Japanese children aged 8-12 years with a spherical equivalent refractive error of - 1.00 to - 6.00 diopters were included. A total of 41 participants who had been wearing the OK lenses successfully for 3 months were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either the combination of OK and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution (combination group) or monotherapy with OK (monotherapy group). Subjects in the combination group started to use atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution once nightly from 3 months after the start of OK. Axial length was measured every 3 months using non-contact laser interferometry (IOLMaster), and the axial length measurement at month 3 of OK therapy was used as the baseline value in both groups. The increase in axial length over 1 year was compared between the two groups.

RESULTS

A total of 40 consecutive subjects (20 subjects in the combination group and 20 in the monotherapy group) were followed for 1 year. The increase in axial length over 1 year was 0.09 ± 0.12 mm in the combination group and 0.19 ± 0.15 mm in the monotherapy group (P = 0.0356, unpaired t test).

CONCLUSION

During the 1-year follow-up, the combination of OK and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution was more effective in slowing axial elongation than OK monotherapy in children with myopia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, 1-847 Amanuma-cho, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, 330-8503, Japan. nozomik@omiya.jichi.ac.jp.Konno Eye Clinic, Saitama, Japan.Omiya Hamada Eye Clinic, Saitama, Japan.Department of Hematology, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, Saitama, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, 1-847 Amanuma-cho, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, 330-8503, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, 1-847 Amanuma-cho, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama, 330-8503, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29974278

Citation

Kinoshita, Nozomi, et al. "Additive Effects of Orthokeratology and Atropine 0.01% Ophthalmic Solution in Slowing Axial Elongation in Children With Myopia: First Year Results." Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 62, no. 5, 2018, pp. 544-553.
Kinoshita N, Konno Y, Hamada N, et al. Additive effects of orthokeratology and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution in slowing axial elongation in children with myopia: first year results. Jpn J Ophthalmol. 2018;62(5):544-553.
Kinoshita, N., Konno, Y., Hamada, N., Kanda, Y., Shimmura-Tomita, M., & Kakehashi, A. (2018). Additive effects of orthokeratology and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution in slowing axial elongation in children with myopia: first year results. Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology, 62(5), 544-553. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10384-018-0608-3
Kinoshita N, et al. Additive Effects of Orthokeratology and Atropine 0.01% Ophthalmic Solution in Slowing Axial Elongation in Children With Myopia: First Year Results. Jpn J Ophthalmol. 2018;62(5):544-553. PubMed PMID: 29974278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Additive effects of orthokeratology and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution in slowing axial elongation in children with myopia: first year results. AU - Kinoshita,Nozomi, AU - Konno,Yasuhiro, AU - Hamada,Naoki, AU - Kanda,Yoshinobu, AU - Shimmura-Tomita,Machiko, AU - Kakehashi,Akihiro, Y1 - 2018/07/04/ PY - 2018/03/11/received PY - 2018/06/04/accepted PY - 2018/7/6/pubmed PY - 2018/9/6/medline PY - 2018/7/6/entrez KW - Additive effects KW - Atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution KW - Axial length KW - Myopia KW - Orthokeratology SP - 544 EP - 553 JF - Japanese journal of ophthalmology JO - Jpn. J. Ophthalmol. VL - 62 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the additive effects of orthokeratology (OK) and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution, both of which are effective procedures to slow axial elongation in children with myopia. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical trial. METHODS: Japanese children aged 8-12 years with a spherical equivalent refractive error of - 1.00 to - 6.00 diopters were included. A total of 41 participants who had been wearing the OK lenses successfully for 3 months were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either the combination of OK and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution (combination group) or monotherapy with OK (monotherapy group). Subjects in the combination group started to use atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution once nightly from 3 months after the start of OK. Axial length was measured every 3 months using non-contact laser interferometry (IOLMaster), and the axial length measurement at month 3 of OK therapy was used as the baseline value in both groups. The increase in axial length over 1 year was compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 40 consecutive subjects (20 subjects in the combination group and 20 in the monotherapy group) were followed for 1 year. The increase in axial length over 1 year was 0.09 ± 0.12 mm in the combination group and 0.19 ± 0.15 mm in the monotherapy group (P = 0.0356, unpaired t test). CONCLUSION: During the 1-year follow-up, the combination of OK and atropine 0.01% ophthalmic solution was more effective in slowing axial elongation than OK monotherapy in children with myopia. SN - 1613-2246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29974278/Additive_effects_of_orthokeratology_and_atropine_0_01_ophthalmic_solution_in_slowing_axial_elongation_in_children_with_myopia:_first_year_results_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10384-018-0608-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -