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Comparative study of the phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn accumulation in nine crops grown in a calcareous soil and an acidic soil.
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10; 644:770-780.ST

Abstract

The increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in agriculture and consumer products has created the need to evaluate their impact on crops. Nine crops were investigated: wheat, maize, radish, bean, lettuce, tomato, pea, cucumber, and beet. The toxic effects of ZnO NPs on seed germination, plant growth, and biochemical parameters, including photosynthetic pigments, protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reactive oxygen species (ROS), enzymes of the antioxidant defence system, as well as the Zn translocation in the plants were investigated using pots containing non-contaminated or ZnO NP-contaminated soil at concentrations of 20, 225, 450, and 900 mg Zn kg-1. Two soils with different physicochemical properties, namely a calcareous soil and an acidic soil, were used. The total and available Zn in the soils were correlated with the Zn in the plants (roots and shoots) and the observed effects. In the calcareous soil, the available Zn was very low and the phytotoxicity was limited to a slight reduction in the biomass for wheat, cucumber, and beet at the highest concentration. Only beet showed an increase in photosynthetic pigments. The parameters related to oxidative stress were affected to different degrees depending on the crop, with the exceptions of maize, lettuce, pea, and beet. In the acidic soil, the available Zn was high, and the germination of bean, tomato, lettuce, and beet, and the growth of most of the crops were seriously affected. The calculated EC50 values (growth) in the acidic soil ranged from 110 to 520 mg Zn kg-1. The photosynthetic pigments and most of the markers of oxidative stress were negatively affected in maize, wheat, bean, and pea. However, these changes were not always associated with a decrease in plant weight. In summary, soil pH and plant species are key factors affecting the Zn availability and phytotoxicity of ZnO NPs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: cgarcia@inia.es.Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Chemical & Food Technology Department, Ciudad Universitaria. Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: ana.obrador@upm.es.Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Chemical & Food Technology Department, Ciudad Universitaria. Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: demetrio.gonzalez@upm.es.Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: babin@inia.es.Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Environment Department, Ctra. A Coruña, km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: mdfdez@inia.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29990925

Citation

García-Gómez, Concepción, et al. "Comparative Study of the Phytotoxicity of ZnO Nanoparticles and Zn Accumulation in Nine Crops Grown in a Calcareous Soil and an Acidic Soil." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 644, 2018, pp. 770-780.
García-Gómez C, Obrador A, González D, et al. Comparative study of the phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn accumulation in nine crops grown in a calcareous soil and an acidic soil. Sci Total Environ. 2018;644:770-780.
García-Gómez, C., Obrador, A., González, D., Babín, M., & Fernández, M. D. (2018). Comparative study of the phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn accumulation in nine crops grown in a calcareous soil and an acidic soil. The Science of the Total Environment, 644, 770-780. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.356
García-Gómez C, et al. Comparative Study of the Phytotoxicity of ZnO Nanoparticles and Zn Accumulation in Nine Crops Grown in a Calcareous Soil and an Acidic Soil. Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10;644:770-780. PubMed PMID: 29990925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative study of the phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn accumulation in nine crops grown in a calcareous soil and an acidic soil. AU - García-Gómez,Concepción, AU - Obrador,Ana, AU - González,Demetrio, AU - Babín,Mar, AU - Fernández,María Dolores, Y1 - 2018/07/11/ PY - 2018/03/23/received PY - 2018/06/28/revised PY - 2018/06/28/accepted PY - 2018/7/11/pubmed PY - 2018/7/11/medline PY - 2018/7/11/entrez KW - Plant oxidative stress KW - Soil pH KW - Zn availability KW - Zn uptake KW - ZnO nanoparticles SP - 770 EP - 780 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 644 N2 - The increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in agriculture and consumer products has created the need to evaluate their impact on crops. Nine crops were investigated: wheat, maize, radish, bean, lettuce, tomato, pea, cucumber, and beet. The toxic effects of ZnO NPs on seed germination, plant growth, and biochemical parameters, including photosynthetic pigments, protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reactive oxygen species (ROS), enzymes of the antioxidant defence system, as well as the Zn translocation in the plants were investigated using pots containing non-contaminated or ZnO NP-contaminated soil at concentrations of 20, 225, 450, and 900 mg Zn kg-1. Two soils with different physicochemical properties, namely a calcareous soil and an acidic soil, were used. The total and available Zn in the soils were correlated with the Zn in the plants (roots and shoots) and the observed effects. In the calcareous soil, the available Zn was very low and the phytotoxicity was limited to a slight reduction in the biomass for wheat, cucumber, and beet at the highest concentration. Only beet showed an increase in photosynthetic pigments. The parameters related to oxidative stress were affected to different degrees depending on the crop, with the exceptions of maize, lettuce, pea, and beet. In the acidic soil, the available Zn was high, and the germination of bean, tomato, lettuce, and beet, and the growth of most of the crops were seriously affected. The calculated EC50 values (growth) in the acidic soil ranged from 110 to 520 mg Zn kg-1. The photosynthetic pigments and most of the markers of oxidative stress were negatively affected in maize, wheat, bean, and pea. However, these changes were not always associated with a decrease in plant weight. In summary, soil pH and plant species are key factors affecting the Zn availability and phytotoxicity of ZnO NPs. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29990925/Comparative_study_of_the_phytotoxicity_of_ZnO_nanoparticles_and_Zn_accumulation_in_nine_crops_grown_in_a_calcareous_soil_and_an_acidic_soil_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(18)32432-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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