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The perceived influence of cost-offset community-supported agriculture on food access among low-income families.
Public Health Nutr. 2018 10; 21(15):2866-2874.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine perspectives on food access among low-income families participating in a cost-offset community-supported agriculture (CO-CSA) programme.

DESIGN

Farm Fresh Foods for Healthy Kids (F3HK) is a multicentre randomized intervention trial assessing the effect of CO-CSA on dietary intake and quality among children from low-income families. Focus groups were conducted at the end of the first CO-CSA season. Participants were interviewed about programme experiences, framed by five dimensions of food access: availability, accessibility, affordability, acceptability and accommodation. Transcribed data were coded on these dimensions plus emergent themes.

SETTING

Nine communities in the US states of New York, North Carolina, Washington and Vermont.

SUBJECTS

Fifty-three F3HK adults with children.

RESULTS

CSA models were structured by partner farms. Produce quantity was abundant; however, availability was enhanced for participants who were able to select their own produce items. Flexible CSA pick-up times and locations made produce pick-up more accessible. Despite being affordable to most, payment timing was a barrier for some. Unfamiliar foods and quick spoilage hindered acceptability through challenging meal planning, despite accommodations that included preparation advice.

CONCLUSIONS

Although CO-CSA may facilitate increased access to fruits and vegetables for low-income families, perceptions of positive diet change may be limited by the ability to incorporate share pick-up into regular travel patterns and meal planning. Food waste concerns may be particularly acute for families with constrained resources. Future research should examine whether CO-CSA with flexible logistics and produce self-selection are sustainable for low-income families and CSA farms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine,Department of Pediatrics,School of Medicine,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,231 MacNider,CB#7225,Chapel Hill,NC 27599-7225,USA.2Brody School of Medicine,East Carolina University,Greenville,NC,USA.3Department of Nutrition,The University of North Carolina at Greensboro,Greensboro,NC,USA.4Division of Nutritional Sciences,Cornell University,Ithaca,NY,USA.4Division of Nutritional Sciences,Cornell University,Ithaca,NY,USA.5Department of Community Development and Applied Economics,University of Vermont,Burlington,VT,USA.5Department of Community Development and Applied Economics,University of Vermont,Burlington,VT,USA.6Ecological Agriculture and Food Systems,The Evergreen State College,Olympia,WA,USA.7Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.4Division of Nutritional Sciences,Cornell University,Ithaca,NY,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29991375

Citation

White, Michelle J., et al. "The Perceived Influence of Cost-offset Community-supported Agriculture On Food Access Among Low-income Families." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 15, 2018, pp. 2866-2874.
White MJ, Jilcott Pitts SB, McGuirt JT, et al. The perceived influence of cost-offset community-supported agriculture on food access among low-income families. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(15):2866-2874.
White, M. J., Jilcott Pitts, S. B., McGuirt, J. T., Hanson, K. L., Morgan, E. H., Kolodinsky, J., Wang, W., Sitaker, M., Ammerman, A. S., & Seguin, R. A. (2018). The perceived influence of cost-offset community-supported agriculture on food access among low-income families. Public Health Nutrition, 21(15), 2866-2874. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018001751
White MJ, et al. The Perceived Influence of Cost-offset Community-supported Agriculture On Food Access Among Low-income Families. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(15):2866-2874. PubMed PMID: 29991375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The perceived influence of cost-offset community-supported agriculture on food access among low-income families. AU - White,Michelle J, AU - Jilcott Pitts,Stephanie B, AU - McGuirt,Jared T, AU - Hanson,Karla L, AU - Morgan,Emily H, AU - Kolodinsky,Jane, AU - Wang,Weiwei, AU - Sitaker,Marilyn, AU - Ammerman,Alice S, AU - Seguin,Rebecca A, Y1 - 2018/07/11/ PY - 2018/7/12/pubmed PY - 2019/10/11/medline PY - 2018/7/12/entrez KW - Community-supported agriculture KW - Obesity KW - Poverty KW - Vegetable consumption SP - 2866 EP - 2874 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 21 IS - 15 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine perspectives on food access among low-income families participating in a cost-offset community-supported agriculture (CO-CSA) programme. DESIGN: Farm Fresh Foods for Healthy Kids (F3HK) is a multicentre randomized intervention trial assessing the effect of CO-CSA on dietary intake and quality among children from low-income families. Focus groups were conducted at the end of the first CO-CSA season. Participants were interviewed about programme experiences, framed by five dimensions of food access: availability, accessibility, affordability, acceptability and accommodation. Transcribed data were coded on these dimensions plus emergent themes. SETTING: Nine communities in the US states of New York, North Carolina, Washington and Vermont. SUBJECTS: Fifty-three F3HK adults with children. RESULTS: CSA models were structured by partner farms. Produce quantity was abundant; however, availability was enhanced for participants who were able to select their own produce items. Flexible CSA pick-up times and locations made produce pick-up more accessible. Despite being affordable to most, payment timing was a barrier for some. Unfamiliar foods and quick spoilage hindered acceptability through challenging meal planning, despite accommodations that included preparation advice. CONCLUSIONS: Although CO-CSA may facilitate increased access to fruits and vegetables for low-income families, perceptions of positive diet change may be limited by the ability to incorporate share pick-up into regular travel patterns and meal planning. Food waste concerns may be particularly acute for families with constrained resources. Future research should examine whether CO-CSA with flexible logistics and produce self-selection are sustainable for low-income families and CSA farms. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29991375/The_perceived_influence_of_cost_offset_community_supported_agriculture_on_food_access_among_low_income_families_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980018001751/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -