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Methanol consumption drives the bacterial chloromethane sink in a forest soil.
ISME J. 2018 11; 12(11):2681-2693.IJ

Abstract

Halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by terrestrial ecosystems, such as chloromethane (CH3Cl), have pronounced effects on troposphere and stratosphere chemistry and climate. The magnitude of the global CH3Cl sink is uncertain since it involves a largely uncharacterized microbial sink. CH3Cl represents a growth substrate for some specialized methylotrophs, while methanol (CH3OH), formed in much larger amounts in terrestrial environments, may be more widely used by such microorganisms. Direct measurements of CH3Cl degradation rates in two field campaigns and in microcosms allowed the identification of top soil horizons (i.e., organic plus mineral A horizon) as the major biotic sink in a deciduous forest. Metabolically active members of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were identified by taxonomic and functional gene biomarkers following stable isotope labeling (SIP) of microcosms with CH3Cl and CH3OH, added alone or together as the [13C]-isotopologue. Well-studied reference CH3Cl degraders, such as Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, were not involved in the sink activity of the studied soil. Nonetheless, only sequences of the cmuA chloromethane dehalogenase gene highly similar to those of known strains were detected, suggesting the relevance of horizontal gene transfer for CH3Cl degradation in forest soil. Further, CH3Cl consumption rate increased in the presence of CH3OH. Members of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were also 13C-labeled upon [13C]-CH3OH amendment. These findings suggest that key bacterial CH3Cl degraders in forest soil benefit from CH3OH as an alternative substrate. For soil CH3Cl-utilizing methylotrophs, utilization of several one-carbon compounds may represent a competitive advantage over heterotrophs that cannot utilize one-carbon compounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Strasbourg, France. Department of Ecological Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.Department of Ecological Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Strasbourg, France. UMR FARE 614 Fractionnement des AgroRessources et Environnement, Chaire AFERE, INRA, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France.Microbial Biogeochemistry, RA Landscape Functioning, ZALF Leibniz Centre for Landscape Research, Müncheberg, Germany.Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Strasbourg, France.Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Strasbourg, France. francoise.bringel@unistra.fr.Microbial Biogeochemistry, RA Landscape Functioning, ZALF Leibniz Centre for Landscape Research, Müncheberg, Germany. Kolb@zalf.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29991765

Citation

Chaignaud, Pauline, et al. "Methanol Consumption Drives the Bacterial Chloromethane Sink in a Forest Soil." The ISME Journal, vol. 12, no. 11, 2018, pp. 2681-2693.
Chaignaud P, Morawe M, Besaury L, et al. Methanol consumption drives the bacterial chloromethane sink in a forest soil. ISME J. 2018;12(11):2681-2693.
Chaignaud, P., Morawe, M., Besaury, L., Kröber, E., Vuilleumier, S., Bringel, F., & Kolb, S. (2018). Methanol consumption drives the bacterial chloromethane sink in a forest soil. The ISME Journal, 12(11), 2681-2693. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-018-0228-4
Chaignaud P, et al. Methanol Consumption Drives the Bacterial Chloromethane Sink in a Forest Soil. ISME J. 2018;12(11):2681-2693. PubMed PMID: 29991765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methanol consumption drives the bacterial chloromethane sink in a forest soil. AU - Chaignaud,Pauline, AU - Morawe,Mareen, AU - Besaury,Ludovic, AU - Kröber,Eileen, AU - Vuilleumier,Stéphane, AU - Bringel,Françoise, AU - Kolb,Steffen, Y1 - 2018/07/10/ PY - 2018/02/16/received PY - 2018/06/15/accepted PY - 2018/06/01/revised PY - 2018/7/12/pubmed PY - 2019/5/31/medline PY - 2018/7/12/entrez SP - 2681 EP - 2693 JF - The ISME journal JO - ISME J VL - 12 IS - 11 N2 - Halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by terrestrial ecosystems, such as chloromethane (CH3Cl), have pronounced effects on troposphere and stratosphere chemistry and climate. The magnitude of the global CH3Cl sink is uncertain since it involves a largely uncharacterized microbial sink. CH3Cl represents a growth substrate for some specialized methylotrophs, while methanol (CH3OH), formed in much larger amounts in terrestrial environments, may be more widely used by such microorganisms. Direct measurements of CH3Cl degradation rates in two field campaigns and in microcosms allowed the identification of top soil horizons (i.e., organic plus mineral A horizon) as the major biotic sink in a deciduous forest. Metabolically active members of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were identified by taxonomic and functional gene biomarkers following stable isotope labeling (SIP) of microcosms with CH3Cl and CH3OH, added alone or together as the [13C]-isotopologue. Well-studied reference CH3Cl degraders, such as Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, were not involved in the sink activity of the studied soil. Nonetheless, only sequences of the cmuA chloromethane dehalogenase gene highly similar to those of known strains were detected, suggesting the relevance of horizontal gene transfer for CH3Cl degradation in forest soil. Further, CH3Cl consumption rate increased in the presence of CH3OH. Members of Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were also 13C-labeled upon [13C]-CH3OH amendment. These findings suggest that key bacterial CH3Cl degraders in forest soil benefit from CH3OH as an alternative substrate. For soil CH3Cl-utilizing methylotrophs, utilization of several one-carbon compounds may represent a competitive advantage over heterotrophs that cannot utilize one-carbon compounds. SN - 1751-7370 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29991765/Methanol_consumption_drives_the_bacterial_chloromethane_sink_in_a_forest_soil_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41396-018-0228-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -