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Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants.
Int J Nurs Stud 2019; 91:146-147IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tongue-tie (ankylglossia) occurs when there is an anterior attachment near the tip of the tongue resulting in restricted tongue movement. It is reported to be a cause of poor breastfeeding in infants and nipple pain in breastfeeding mothers.

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the study were to determine whether frenotomy is safe and effective in improving ability to feed orally among infants.

INTERVENTION/METHODS

Frenotomy may correct the restriction of tongue movement and allow improved breast feeding and reduced maternal nipple pain. Randomised, quasi-randomised cluster-randomised controlled trials that compared frenotomy verses no frenotomy or frenotomy verses sham procedure were included in the review. Participants were infants with tongue-tie experiencing feeding problems, or whose breast feeding mothers were experiencing nipple pain.

RESULTS

Five studies (N = 302) met the inclusion criteria. Pooled analysis of two studies showed no change following frenotomy (mean difference (MD) -0.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.6 to 0.5 units on a 10-point feeding scale). A third study showed objective improvement on a 12-point feeding scale (MD 3.5, 95% CI 3.1 to 4.0 units of a 12-point feeding scale). Pooled analysis of three studies (n = 212) showed a reduction in maternal pain scores following frenotomy (MD -0.7, 95% CI -1.4 to -0.1 units on a 10-point pain scale). These studies had serious methodological shortcomings.

CONCLUSION

Investigators did not find a consistent positive effect on infant breastfeeding following frenotomy. A short-term reduction in breast pain was found among breastfeeding mothers. Small trial numbers and methodological issues meant no definitive benefit for frenotomy in infants with tongue-tie could be proved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Australia; School of Nursing at the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: jill.campbell@health.qld.gov.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30001811

Citation

Campbell, Jill. "Frenotomy for Tongue-tie in Newborn Infants." International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 91, 2019, pp. 146-147.
Campbell J. Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants. Int J Nurs Stud. 2019;91:146-147.
Campbell, J. (2019). Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 91, pp. 146-147. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.03.022.
Campbell J. Frenotomy for Tongue-tie in Newborn Infants. Int J Nurs Stud. 2019;91:146-147. PubMed PMID: 30001811.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Frenotomy for tongue-tie in newborn infants. A1 - Campbell,Jill, Y1 - 2018/04/03/ PY - 2018/7/14/pubmed PY - 2019/8/27/medline PY - 2018/7/14/entrez KW - Ankylglossia KW - Breastfeeding KW - Frenotomy KW - Frenulum KW - Tongue-tie SP - 146 EP - 147 JF - International journal of nursing studies JO - Int J Nurs Stud VL - 91 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tongue-tie (ankylglossia) occurs when there is an anterior attachment near the tip of the tongue resulting in restricted tongue movement. It is reported to be a cause of poor breastfeeding in infants and nipple pain in breastfeeding mothers. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to determine whether frenotomy is safe and effective in improving ability to feed orally among infants. INTERVENTION/METHODS: Frenotomy may correct the restriction of tongue movement and allow improved breast feeding and reduced maternal nipple pain. Randomised, quasi-randomised cluster-randomised controlled trials that compared frenotomy verses no frenotomy or frenotomy verses sham procedure were included in the review. Participants were infants with tongue-tie experiencing feeding problems, or whose breast feeding mothers were experiencing nipple pain. RESULTS: Five studies (N = 302) met the inclusion criteria. Pooled analysis of two studies showed no change following frenotomy (mean difference (MD) -0.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.6 to 0.5 units on a 10-point feeding scale). A third study showed objective improvement on a 12-point feeding scale (MD 3.5, 95% CI 3.1 to 4.0 units of a 12-point feeding scale). Pooled analysis of three studies (n = 212) showed a reduction in maternal pain scores following frenotomy (MD -0.7, 95% CI -1.4 to -0.1 units on a 10-point pain scale). These studies had serious methodological shortcomings. CONCLUSION: Investigators did not find a consistent positive effect on infant breastfeeding following frenotomy. A short-term reduction in breast pain was found among breastfeeding mothers. Small trial numbers and methodological issues meant no definitive benefit for frenotomy in infants with tongue-tie could be proved. SN - 1873-491X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30001811/Frenotomy_for_tongue_tie_in_newborn_infants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0020-7489(18)30079-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -