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Evidence of vertical transmission of Zika virus in field-collected eggs of Aedes aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018; 12(7):e0006594PN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Arboviruses are viruses transmitted to humans and other animals by the bite of hematophagous arthropods. Infections caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV), dengue virus (DENV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and the deadlier yellow fever virus (YFV) are current public health problems in several countries, mainly those located in tropical and subtropical regions. One of the main prevention strategies continues to be vector control, with the elimination of breeding sites and surveillance of infested areas. The use of ovitraps for Aedes mosquitos monitoring has already demonstrated promising results, and maybe be also useful for arboviral surveillance.

METHODS

This work aimed to detect natural vertical transmission of arboviruses in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Mosquito egg collection was carried out using ovitraps in Itacoatiara, a mid-size city in Amazonas state, Brazil. Collected eggs were allowed to hatch and larvae were tested for CHIKV, DENV, and ZIKV RNA by RT-qPCR.

RESULTS

A total of 2,057 specimens (1,793 Ae. aegypti and 264 Ae. albopictus), in 154 larvae pools were processed. Results showed one positive pool for CHIKV and one positive pool for ZIKV. The active ZIKV infection was further confirmed by the detection of the negative-strand viral RNA and nucleotide sequencing which confirmed the Asian genotype. The Infection Rate per 1,000 mosquitoes tested was assessed by Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) with 0.45 and 0.44 for CHIKV and ZIKV, respectively, and by Minimum Infection Rate (MIR) with 0.45 for both viruses.

CONCLUSION

To our knowledge, this is the first detection of ZIKV in natural vertical transmission in the Ae. aegypti, a fact that may contribute to ZIKV maintenance in nature during epidemics periods. Furthermore, our results highlight that the use of ovitraps and the molecular detection of arbovirus may contribute to health surveillance, directing the efforts to more efficient transmission blockade.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Surveillance Foundation of Amazonas State FVS, Department of Environmental Surveillance, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.Laboratório de Ecologia de Doenças Transmissíveis na Amazônia, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Programa de Iniciação Científica, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.Laboratório de Ecologia de Doenças Transmissíveis na Amazônia, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratório de Ecologia de Doenças Transmissíveis na Amazônia, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratório de Ecologia de Doenças Transmissíveis na Amazônia, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Imunologia Básica e Aplicada, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.Health Surveillance Foundation of Amazonas State FVS, Department of Environmental Surveillance, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.Health Surveillance Foundation of Amazonas State FVS, Department of Environmental Surveillance, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Laboratory of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors - Oswaldo Cruz Institute - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Health Surveillance Foundation of Amazonas State FVS, Department of Environmental Surveillance, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.Laboratory of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors - Oswaldo Cruz Institute - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratório de Ecologia de Doenças Transmissíveis na Amazônia, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia da Interação Patógeno-Hospedeiro, Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30011278

Citation

da Costa, Cristiano Fernandes, et al. "Evidence of Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus in Field-collected Eggs of Aedes Aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon." PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol. 12, no. 7, 2018, pp. e0006594.
da Costa CF, da Silva AV, do Nascimento VA, et al. Evidence of vertical transmission of Zika virus in field-collected eggs of Aedes aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018;12(7):e0006594.
da Costa, C. F., da Silva, A. V., do Nascimento, V. A., de Souza, V. C., Monteiro, D. C. D. S., Terrazas, W. C. M., ... Naveca, F. G. (2018). Evidence of vertical transmission of Zika virus in field-collected eggs of Aedes aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 12(7), pp. e0006594. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006594.
da Costa CF, et al. Evidence of Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus in Field-collected Eggs of Aedes Aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018;12(7):e0006594. PubMed PMID: 30011278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence of vertical transmission of Zika virus in field-collected eggs of Aedes aegypti in the Brazilian Amazon. AU - da Costa,Cristiano Fernandes, AU - da Silva,Arlesson Viana, AU - do Nascimento,Valdinete Alves, AU - de Souza,Victor Costa, AU - Monteiro,Dana Cristina da Silva, AU - Terrazas,Wagner Cosme Morhy, AU - Dos Passos,Ricardo Augusto, AU - Nascimento,Suzete, AU - Lima,José Bento Pereira, AU - Naveca,Felipe Gomes, Y1 - 2018/07/16/ PY - 2017/12/11/received PY - 2018/06/07/accepted PY - 2018/08/03/revised PY - 2018/7/17/pubmed PY - 2018/12/12/medline PY - 2018/7/17/entrez SP - e0006594 EP - e0006594 JF - PLoS neglected tropical diseases JO - PLoS Negl Trop Dis VL - 12 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Arboviruses are viruses transmitted to humans and other animals by the bite of hematophagous arthropods. Infections caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV), dengue virus (DENV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and the deadlier yellow fever virus (YFV) are current public health problems in several countries, mainly those located in tropical and subtropical regions. One of the main prevention strategies continues to be vector control, with the elimination of breeding sites and surveillance of infested areas. The use of ovitraps for Aedes mosquitos monitoring has already demonstrated promising results, and maybe be also useful for arboviral surveillance. METHODS: This work aimed to detect natural vertical transmission of arboviruses in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Mosquito egg collection was carried out using ovitraps in Itacoatiara, a mid-size city in Amazonas state, Brazil. Collected eggs were allowed to hatch and larvae were tested for CHIKV, DENV, and ZIKV RNA by RT-qPCR. RESULTS: A total of 2,057 specimens (1,793 Ae. aegypti and 264 Ae. albopictus), in 154 larvae pools were processed. Results showed one positive pool for CHIKV and one positive pool for ZIKV. The active ZIKV infection was further confirmed by the detection of the negative-strand viral RNA and nucleotide sequencing which confirmed the Asian genotype. The Infection Rate per 1,000 mosquitoes tested was assessed by Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) with 0.45 and 0.44 for CHIKV and ZIKV, respectively, and by Minimum Infection Rate (MIR) with 0.45 for both viruses. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first detection of ZIKV in natural vertical transmission in the Ae. aegypti, a fact that may contribute to ZIKV maintenance in nature during epidemics periods. Furthermore, our results highlight that the use of ovitraps and the molecular detection of arbovirus may contribute to health surveillance, directing the efforts to more efficient transmission blockade. SN - 1935-2735 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30011278/Evidence_of_vertical_transmission_of_Zika_virus_in_field_collected_eggs_of_Aedes_aegypti_in_the_Brazilian_Amazon_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006594 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -