Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Occupational emphysema in South African miners at autopsy; 1975-2014.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2018; 91(8):981-990IA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine the associations between exposure duration, measured by employment tenure, and emphysema presence and severity in black and white South African miners at autopsy.

METHODS

We examined the association between mining tenure and emphysema presence or severity using the Pathology Automation (PATHAUT) database, 1975-2014. We used logistic regression models adjusted for age, tuberculosis, HIV status, and year of death. The effect of smoking on the presence and severity of emphysema was assessed in a sub-analysis of white miners.

RESULTS

Mining tenure was significantly associated with increased odds of emphysema presence in black and white miners. For every 10-year increase in tenure, black miners had a 17% increase in odds of emphysema [ORblack = 1.17 (95% CI 1.12, 1.22)] and white miners had a 7% increase in odds of the disease [ORwhite = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04, 1.10)]. Tenure was significantly associated with emphysema severity among black miners [ORseverity = 1.16 (95% CI 1.06, 1.28)]. In a subset of white miners with smoking status, we found that for every 10 years of tenure, there is a significant increase in odds of emphysema presence and severity [ORpresence = 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.19); ORseverity = 1.06 (95% CI 1.00, 1.10)] after adjusting for smoking.

CONCLUSIONS

We observed a significant relationship between mining tenure and emphysema severity among South African miners in PATHAUT between 1975 and 2014. This relationship was evident in multi-variable analyses adjusted for smoking among white miners. Hazards from long term exposure to inhaled mineral dust leading to lung damage (silicosis, fibrosis, COPD) is evident and warrants further improvement of working conditions and prevention measures in South African mines especially for black workers. Further research is needed to determine if there is an effect of TB and HIV co-infection on the development of emphysema.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA. sl.mabila@gmail.com.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.National Institute of Occupational Health, Johannesburg, South Africa. School of Pathology, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.National Institute of Occupational Health, Johannesburg, South Africa. School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30014161

Citation

Mabila, Sithembile L., et al. "Occupational Emphysema in South African Miners at Autopsy; 1975-2014." International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol. 91, no. 8, 2018, pp. 981-990.
Mabila SL, Almberg KS, Friedman L, et al. Occupational emphysema in South African miners at autopsy; 1975-2014. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2018;91(8):981-990.
Mabila, S. L., Almberg, K. S., Friedman, L., Cohen, R., Ndlovu, N., Vorajee, N., & Murray, J. (2018). Occupational emphysema in South African miners at autopsy; 1975-2014. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 91(8), pp. 981-990. doi:10.1007/s00420-018-1335-2.
Mabila SL, et al. Occupational Emphysema in South African Miners at Autopsy; 1975-2014. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2018;91(8):981-990. PubMed PMID: 30014161.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Occupational emphysema in South African miners at autopsy; 1975-2014. AU - Mabila,Sithembile L, AU - Almberg,Kirsten S, AU - Friedman,Lee, AU - Cohen,Robert, AU - Ndlovu,Ntombizodwa, AU - Vorajee,Naseema, AU - Murray,Jill, Y1 - 2018/07/16/ PY - 2017/11/27/received PY - 2018/07/02/accepted PY - 2018/7/18/pubmed PY - 2019/2/14/medline PY - 2018/7/18/entrez KW - COPD KW - Emphysema KW - Mining KW - Occupation KW - PATHAUT KW - South Africa SP - 981 EP - 990 JF - International archives of occupational and environmental health JO - Int Arch Occup Environ Health VL - 91 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine the associations between exposure duration, measured by employment tenure, and emphysema presence and severity in black and white South African miners at autopsy. METHODS: We examined the association between mining tenure and emphysema presence or severity using the Pathology Automation (PATHAUT) database, 1975-2014. We used logistic regression models adjusted for age, tuberculosis, HIV status, and year of death. The effect of smoking on the presence and severity of emphysema was assessed in a sub-analysis of white miners. RESULTS: Mining tenure was significantly associated with increased odds of emphysema presence in black and white miners. For every 10-year increase in tenure, black miners had a 17% increase in odds of emphysema [ORblack = 1.17 (95% CI 1.12, 1.22)] and white miners had a 7% increase in odds of the disease [ORwhite = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04, 1.10)]. Tenure was significantly associated with emphysema severity among black miners [ORseverity = 1.16 (95% CI 1.06, 1.28)]. In a subset of white miners with smoking status, we found that for every 10 years of tenure, there is a significant increase in odds of emphysema presence and severity [ORpresence = 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.19); ORseverity = 1.06 (95% CI 1.00, 1.10)] after adjusting for smoking. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a significant relationship between mining tenure and emphysema severity among South African miners in PATHAUT between 1975 and 2014. This relationship was evident in multi-variable analyses adjusted for smoking among white miners. Hazards from long term exposure to inhaled mineral dust leading to lung damage (silicosis, fibrosis, COPD) is evident and warrants further improvement of working conditions and prevention measures in South African mines especially for black workers. Further research is needed to determine if there is an effect of TB and HIV co-infection on the development of emphysema. SN - 1432-1246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30014161/Occupational_emphysema_in_South_African_miners_at_autopsy L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-018-1335-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -