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Bi-directional longitudinal associations between different types of bullying victimization, suicide ideation/attempts, and depression among a large sample of European adolescents.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2019 02; 60(2):209-215.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The association between bullying victimization and depression, suicide ideation and suicide attempts has been studied mainly in cross-sectional studies. This study aims to test the bidirectional effect and the chronicity versus sporadic effect of physical, verbal, and relational bullying victimization on suicidal ideation/attempts and depression.

METHODS

Longitudinal assessments with an interval of 3- and 12-months were performed within a sample of 2,933 adolescents (56.1% females; mean age 14.78, SD = .89) from 10 European countries, participating in the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) school-based multicenter control sample. Multilevel Structural Equation Models were used, controlling for sociodemographic variables. Victimization was considered chronic when a student was victimized in the first two time points and sporadic when it was reported only at one point but not in another.

RESULTS

Bidirectional prospective association between all types of victimization and depression were found. Among participants, who reported victimization once (but not twice), physical victimization, but not verbal and relational, was associated with later suicidal ideation and attempts. Chronic victimization of any type increased likelihood for later depression compared with sporadic and no-victimization. Chronic relational victimization increased the likelihood of later suicidal ideation, and chronic physical victimization increased the likelihood for suicidal attempts.

CONCLUSIONS

The results support the bidirectional effect of victimization and depression and indicate that there are complex longitudinal associations between victimization and suicidal ideation/attempts. Physical victimization may especially carry effect on suicidal risk over time. Interventions should focus on victimization as a cause of distress but also aim to prevent vulnerable adolescents from becoming targets of victimization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Feinberg Child Study Centre, Schneider Children's Medical Centre, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzlyia, Israel.Feinberg Child Study Centre, Schneider Children's Medical Centre, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.Feinberg Child Study Centre, Schneider Children's Medical Centre, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty, Rome, Italy. Kazakh National Medical University, Almaty, Kazakhstan.National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.Vadaskert Child Psychiatry Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.Vadaskert Child Psychiatry Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary.Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.Clinical Psychology Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.Department Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, State Hospital Hall in Tyrol, Hall in Tyrol, Austria.Addiction help services B.I.N., Innsbruck, Austria.National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland.National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU) de Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nancy, France.Slovene Center for Suicide Research, UP IAM, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.Slovene Center for Suicide Research, UP IAM, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Tallinn, Estonia. School of Governance, Law and Society, Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Tallinn, Estonia. School of Natural Sciences and Health, Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30024024

Citation

Brunstein Klomek, Anat, et al. "Bi-directional Longitudinal Associations Between Different Types of Bullying Victimization, Suicide Ideation/attempts, and Depression Among a Large Sample of European Adolescents." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 60, no. 2, 2019, pp. 209-215.
Brunstein Klomek A, Barzilay S, Apter A, et al. Bi-directional longitudinal associations between different types of bullying victimization, suicide ideation/attempts, and depression among a large sample of European adolescents. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2019;60(2):209-215.
Brunstein Klomek, A., Barzilay, S., Apter, A., Carli, V., Hoven, C. W., Sarchiapone, M., Hadlaczky, G., Balazs, J., Kereszteny, A., Brunner, R., Kaess, M., Bobes, J., Saiz, P. A., Cosman, D., Haring, C., Banzer, R., McMahon, E., Keeley, H., Kahn, J. P., ... Wasserman, D. (2019). Bi-directional longitudinal associations between different types of bullying victimization, suicide ideation/attempts, and depression among a large sample of European adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 60(2), 209-215. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12951
Brunstein Klomek A, et al. Bi-directional Longitudinal Associations Between Different Types of Bullying Victimization, Suicide Ideation/attempts, and Depression Among a Large Sample of European Adolescents. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2019;60(2):209-215. PubMed PMID: 30024024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bi-directional longitudinal associations between different types of bullying victimization, suicide ideation/attempts, and depression among a large sample of European adolescents. AU - Brunstein Klomek,Anat, AU - Barzilay,Shira, AU - Apter,Alan, AU - Carli,Vladimir, AU - Hoven,Christina W, AU - Sarchiapone,Marco, AU - Hadlaczky,Gergö, AU - Balazs,Judit, AU - Kereszteny,Agnes, AU - Brunner,Romuald, AU - Kaess,Michael, AU - Bobes,Julio, AU - Saiz,Pilar A, AU - Cosman,Doina, AU - Haring,Christian, AU - Banzer,Raphaela, AU - McMahon,Elaine, AU - Keeley,Helen, AU - Kahn,Jean-Pierre, AU - Postuvan,Vita, AU - Podlogar,Tina, AU - Sisask,Merike, AU - Varnik,Airi, AU - Wasserman,Danuta, Y1 - 2018/07/19/ PY - 2018/06/08/accepted PY - 2018/7/20/pubmed PY - 2020/6/17/medline PY - 2018/7/20/entrez KW - SEYLE KW - Bullying KW - depression KW - prevention KW - suicide KW - suicide attempt KW - suicide ideation KW - victimization SP - 209 EP - 215 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The association between bullying victimization and depression, suicide ideation and suicide attempts has been studied mainly in cross-sectional studies. This study aims to test the bidirectional effect and the chronicity versus sporadic effect of physical, verbal, and relational bullying victimization on suicidal ideation/attempts and depression. METHODS: Longitudinal assessments with an interval of 3- and 12-months were performed within a sample of 2,933 adolescents (56.1% females; mean age 14.78, SD = .89) from 10 European countries, participating in the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) school-based multicenter control sample. Multilevel Structural Equation Models were used, controlling for sociodemographic variables. Victimization was considered chronic when a student was victimized in the first two time points and sporadic when it was reported only at one point but not in another. RESULTS: Bidirectional prospective association between all types of victimization and depression were found. Among participants, who reported victimization once (but not twice), physical victimization, but not verbal and relational, was associated with later suicidal ideation and attempts. Chronic victimization of any type increased likelihood for later depression compared with sporadic and no-victimization. Chronic relational victimization increased the likelihood of later suicidal ideation, and chronic physical victimization increased the likelihood for suicidal attempts. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the bidirectional effect of victimization and depression and indicate that there are complex longitudinal associations between victimization and suicidal ideation/attempts. Physical victimization may especially carry effect on suicidal risk over time. Interventions should focus on victimization as a cause of distress but also aim to prevent vulnerable adolescents from becoming targets of victimization. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30024024/Bi_directional_longitudinal_associations_between_different_types_of_bullying_victimization_suicide_ideation/attempts_and_depression_among_a_large_sample_of_European_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12951 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -