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HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults.
Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 07 19; 15:E94.PC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Receipt of housing assistance from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is associated with improved health among adults and lower rates of unmet medical need among adults and young children. However, it is unclear whether HUD housing assistance is associated with healthier behaviors. The objective of our study was to assess whether participation in HUD housing assistance programs is associated with increased physical activity among low-income adults.

METHODS

In 2017, we pooled cross-sectional data from the 2004-2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) linked to administrative records of HUD housing assistance participation. Our primary sample was low-income adults (aged ≥18; <200% of federal poverty level). Using multivariate logistic regression, we calculated the odds of being physically active (≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity activity or equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity) among current HUD housing assistance residents compared with a control group of future residents (adults who would receive assistance within the next 2 years). In a secondary analyses, we examined neighborhood socioeconomic status as a modifier and conducted a subanalysis among nonsenior adults (aged <65).

RESULTS

Among all low-income adults, the adjusted odds of being physically active were similar for current and future residents (odds ratio =1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.46). Among nonseniors, current residents were more likely to be physically active than future residents (odds ratio = 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.97). Associations did not differ by neighborhood socioeconomic status.

CONCLUSION

Receiving HUD housing assistance is associated with being physically active among nonsenior low-income adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Policy & Management, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. VA Health Services Research & Development Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, & Policy, US Department of Veteran Affairs, 11301 Wilshire Blvd, Building 206 Room 250, Los Angeles, CA 90073. E-mail: Michelle.wong6@va.gov.Department of Health Policy & Management, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Health Policy & Management, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30025218

Citation

Wong, Michelle S., et al. "HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults." Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 15, 2018, pp. E94.
Wong MS, Roberts ET, Arnold CM, et al. HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults. Prev Chronic Dis. 2018;15:E94.
Wong, M. S., Roberts, E. T., Arnold, C. M., & Pollack, C. E. (2018). HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults. Preventing Chronic Disease, 15, E94. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd15.170517
Wong MS, et al. HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults. Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 07 19;15:E94. PubMed PMID: 30025218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HUD Housing Assistance and Levels of Physical Activity Among Low-Income Adults. AU - Wong,Michelle S, AU - Roberts,Eric T, AU - Arnold,Carolyn M, AU - Pollack,Craig E, Y1 - 2018/07/19/ PY - 2018/7/20/entrez PY - 2018/7/20/pubmed PY - 2019/1/18/medline SP - E94 EP - E94 JF - Preventing chronic disease JO - Prev Chronic Dis VL - 15 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Receipt of housing assistance from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is associated with improved health among adults and lower rates of unmet medical need among adults and young children. However, it is unclear whether HUD housing assistance is associated with healthier behaviors. The objective of our study was to assess whether participation in HUD housing assistance programs is associated with increased physical activity among low-income adults. METHODS: In 2017, we pooled cross-sectional data from the 2004-2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) linked to administrative records of HUD housing assistance participation. Our primary sample was low-income adults (aged ≥18; <200% of federal poverty level). Using multivariate logistic regression, we calculated the odds of being physically active (≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity activity or equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity) among current HUD housing assistance residents compared with a control group of future residents (adults who would receive assistance within the next 2 years). In a secondary analyses, we examined neighborhood socioeconomic status as a modifier and conducted a subanalysis among nonsenior adults (aged <65). RESULTS: Among all low-income adults, the adjusted odds of being physically active were similar for current and future residents (odds ratio =1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.46). Among nonseniors, current residents were more likely to be physically active than future residents (odds ratio = 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.97). Associations did not differ by neighborhood socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION: Receiving HUD housing assistance is associated with being physically active among nonsenior low-income adults. SN - 1545-1151 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30025218/HUD_Housing_Assistance_and_Levels_of_Physical_Activity_Among_Low_Income_Adults_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2018/17_0517.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -